(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Chestnut Burr, 1931"

*«* 




"And then the blue-eyed Norseman told, 
A saga of the days of old." 



A 



X 



/ 



/ 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/chestnutburr1931kent 



■4- 





^^. 

^''^. 



rCCEWCCD 

This book is presented — to the students and 
friends of Kent State College — in the 
hope — that it may someday serve to re- 
call — the pleasant incidents of that period 
of our lives — when we had little thought — 
for ought — but living. 



^^^r 


a 


K^ 


"Wl 


■A^v^ 


MM 


■t'«^ 


H 




-<e 




CCNTENTS 

Views 

Administration 

Classes 

Athletics 

Activities 

Fraternal Orsanizations 

Features 




J 



.j£:^ 




D EDI CAT I CN 

With sincere and heartfelt appreciation of 
the splendid services which he has render- 
ed this institution, the Senior Class of 
1931 dedicates this number of the Chest- 
nut Burr to Doctor Amos L. Heer. 





*r*»vrr3=ri; 





DR. AMOS L. HEER 





ADMINISTRATICN 



\: 



x: 




17 



iT" 



zr 



16 



Class of Nineteen Thirty-One 

Now that you are about to leave Kent State College, and 
therefore pause a moment here for my benediction, 1 gladly pro- 
nounce it. 

May you ever grow in grace as well as strength of character; 
in wisdom and understanding not less than in knowledge of books; 
in love for children and in good will for all men and women 
whom you may reach even with your influence; in desire that 
shall equal your capacity to serve; and in health and vigor of 
body and mind, such that with length of days given unto you, 
service still be a source of supreme satisfaction to you, as it is to 
the College that helped to equip and inspire you for it. 

JAMES OZRO ENGLEMAN 



18 





DR J.\.\11:S OZRU bXGLhMAN 
President 




19 





R. E. Manchester, M. A. 



Blanche A. Verder, M. A. 



DEAN OF MEN— MATHEMATICS 

The history of mathematics shows an in- 
teresting series of changes from the time it 
was strictly utihtarian through the period 
when it was chiefly, "A handmaiden of 
Theology", to its present return to utili- 
tarian uses. 

Living, as we do, in an age of machines 
we find an increasing demand for courses 
stressing fact information and study of cer- 
tain and logical conclusions from accepted 
assumptions. It is reasonable to find, there- 
fore, that in our modern educational system 
mathematics holds an important place. 

At present we offer a wide variety of 
courses to meet the needs of those majoring 
in our various departments. These range 
from methods for presenting fundamental 
number ideas to children in the Kindergar- 
ten to the highly technical courses for those 
looking forward to the scientific vocations. 



DEAN OF WOMEN 

Graduates of 1931 — For you we trust 
college has been no "finishing school", but 
a place of real beginnings. If the opening 
of college meant the opening of your mind, 
if you have continued to welcome new 
truth, and ever to open your heart wider to 
friendship and your soul to the inflowing 
spirit, if the horizon of your entire being 
has widened, then for you college has been 
a successful adventure. Now as you leave 
the campus to enter into the unknown fu- 
ture, may you accept Robert Browning's 
challenge to "greet the unseen with a cheer." 

hlow leaving all behind, facing to the dawn- 
ing, 

Sons of dear Kent State, welcoming the 
morning, 
Seekers of Light, go forth! 

Heirs to the wisdom treasured through the 
ages. 

E'er scanning wisdom's hook, searching thru 
the pages. 
Seekers of Truth, go forth! 

So college days well done, moved by noble 
vision, 

Our commonwealth to serve, this shall he 
your mission. 
Seekers of Light and Truth. 



20 






i:5i«t!^ 



Ml 



C. S. \an Deuses. M.E. 



J. I'. Johnson, A.B. 



MANUAL IRAINMNG DEPAR IMENT 

The aim of manusl training is to develop 
thru actual participation in hand\vori<. me- 
chanical intelligence m all pupils, irrespec- 
tive of their future \ocations. 

The above statement of the aim of man- 
ual training is the guide for this depart- 
ment. All grade room and rural teachers 
should take work in this department. They 
are the ones who should gi\e an increasing 
amount of this work in the schools of the 
state and they should be prepared to use it 
in motivating other lines of school work. 

The demand still exceeds the supply for 
men who can teach mechanical drawing, 
wootlwork. metalwork, printing, simple me- 
chanics, fiber cord work, etc., and the de- 
partment aims to give a good preparation 
for such positions. 



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

In the long period of time covering social 
development agriculture was among the 
earliest vocations which was clearly defined. 
The intimate relation between continued 
existence and the food supply of people 
establishes a permanent and basic interest. 

While the food getting acti\ities are es- 
sential to satisfs' human needs the vocation 
provdies abundant opportunities to grow 
and mature in the higher le\els of social 
and spiritual attainment. .Agriculture is 
more than a vocation dealing with ma- 
terials, it is a way of living. 

•Agriculture as a \ocation because the 
daily activities are clearly associated, with 
nature provides a body of experience of 
sound educational value. In \iewing the 
subject of agriculture as a stud)' of a moile 
of life economic values would obscure edu- 
cational values. Since human aspirations 
transcend human needs the subject of agri- 
culture is emphasized as means of education. 




21 




^^^^^f/f'\^0ftBK^m^ ^^^Bh 






^^^^^^^^BL '^^>^ ^^^^^^^^^1 



A. Sellew Roberts, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 



Edgar .'\. Packard, M. A. 



DEPARTMENT OF HiSTOR^■ AND 
SOCIAL SCIENCE 

The Department of History and Social 
Science has a two-fold aim. On the one 
hand it attempts to give to the prospective 
history teacher that sound and thorough 
grasp of the subject matter involved without 
which success as a history teacher is impos- 
sible. But on the other hand the depart- 
ment aims to help the general student to the 
cultural background which will enaible him 
to live a well-rounded life and make him a 
more useful citizen. Through the medium 
of history the student learns to know the 
great writers of the past, to become ac- 
quainted with the great thinkers such as 
Plato, Aristotle and Descartes, and to watch 
the growth of science from .Archimedes 
through Roger Bacon to the wonders of the 
present. Through history and its sister 
sciences, government, sociology and econo- 
mics, the student watches the whole stream 
of human progress from the pyramids to 
the present and cannot help being the richer 
and the better equipped for his life work 
thereby. 



THE ENGLISH DEPARTiMENT 

The year 1930-1931 has been made out- 
standing in our English department by the 
addition of new teachers, new courses and 
a much larger enrollment. Professor Sat- 
terfield has been absent on a year's leave of 
absence while working on his doctorate at 
Columbia. Buryl F. Engleman has substi- 
tuted for him. Mr. Engleman has also had 
charge of the Kent Stater. He has been 
assisted by the Editor, Harold Jones, and 
they have greatly improved that publica- 
tion. Professor Stump has been added to 
take care of the speech subjects. The col- 
lege, under his tutelage, has been able to 
place high in inter-collegiate debating. Pro- 
fessor Bross has been added to assist Pro- 
fessor Pake with the Freshman work. Dr. 
Burner of the History department has had 
one class in English throughout the year 
and Miss Mays has had charge of the sub- 
freshman classes. 



22 






Nina S. Humphrey 



D. W. PhARCb. A.M. 



DEPARTMENT OP ART 

The art needs of the Child, the Communit\' 
and the State as given by the .Art Director 
of a neighboring state offers us a clear ob- 
jective for the work of the .Art Department. 

First — .-Xll need sense training and a fine 
discrimination in the selection, the purchase, 
and the use of manufactured articles for the 
person and the home. These may be de- 
scribed as 10IJ% needs. 

Second — The community needs citizens 
who desire attracti\e homes, beautiful \ards, 
parks, plasgrounds, school buildings, mu- 
seums, monuments, and all that contributes 
to civic beauty and civic pride. 

Third — The merchant needs salespeople 
with fine taste and sound aesthetic judgment, 
beautiful show windows, and attractive ad- 
vertising, for these will "sell the goods". 

Fourth — The manufacturer of te.xtiles, wall 
paper, carpets, rugs, furniture, potter>'. glass, 
silverware, jevvelr\, lighting fixtures, and art 
metal products requires designers and artis- 
tic craftsmen who will make these products 
ever more beautiful and attractive. 

Fifth — The printing industrs' requires il- 
lustrators, designers of book and magazine 
covers, artistic magazines and poster adver- 
tising, and attractive labels for toilet prep- 
arations, food containers, etc. 

Sixth — The State requires painters, sculp- 
tors, architects, and museum directors. It 
requires teachers and supervisors of art for 
its elementarv and secondary schools, for its 
colleges and universities. 



DEPARTMENT OP EDUCATION 
AND PSYCHOLOGY 

The Department of Education and Psy- 
chology is striving diligentlv to base its 
psychology firmly upon modern conceptions 
of biology. If it can succeed reasonably 
well in this, notable contributions mav be 
made to the profession of teacning through 
the discovery and formulation of principles 
upon which methods of sound teaching pro- 
cedure may be based. In our basic courses 
in Principles of Education cognizance is 
taken of the changing needs of an industrial 
and economic civilization. The resulting 
conception of the aim of education is not, 
therefore, some antiquated view long since 
discarded, but one fitted to present progress. 
In our courses in Organization and Man- 
agement the attempt is made to put our 
students abreast of the times in motiern 
theory, yet by no means, to leave them in a 
wilderness of "ologies" and "isms ', As far 
as possible we desire that our students shall 
go out to their fields of labor with a real- 
ization of the tasks to be done, and a prac- 
ticality that shall enable thciii to accom- 
plish them successfullv. 




23 





Edith Belle Rowlen, A.M. 



David Olson, M.Sc, A.B. 



FRENCH DEPARTMENT 

What have been the findings of the Mod- 
ern Foreign Language Study? To stress 
greatly the advisability of having the em- 
phasis in teaching placed upon training stu- 
dents to read as soon as possible. To ugre 
this necessity even more in case the language 
is begun in college. 

Since the work of the French Department 
is planned to conform to these principles, it 
is possible very early in the course for 
students to begin to appreciate the spirit of 
France by seeing for themselves how na- 
tional traits, characteristics and problems 
are viewed by some of the literary geniuses 
of that country. Further progress increases 
the number of these points of interest and 
comparison. Time honored and modern 
writings open up new fields and interpreta- 
tions of history, literature, science, art and 
travel. So one may dwell at home, but li\e 
be\ond the seas. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY AND 
GEOLOGY 

How big is your world? How far does 
your imagination soar? How deep does 
your understanding penetrate? To what ex- 
tent is your mind unshackled from super- 
stition and prejudice? The answer to these 
and manv questions like them are functions 
of your geographic study and reading. Even 
to know where the places one reads of are, 
what their climate is and how they are peo- 
pled, is something: but in its wider mean- 
ing, as the science which aims at the ex- 
planation of the adjustment of man to his 
surroundings, there is no problem in past 
history or of present politics and economics 
which cannot be elucidated by the applica- 
tions of the principles of geographw 



24 






A. O. DeWeese, iM.D. 



Bektiia L. NixsoN, M.A, 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND 
PllNSICAL EDUCATION 

The Student Health Service of Kent State 
College is organized upon the three follow- 
ing assumptions: 

1. That educationalls' it is now generally 
recognized that Health is a fundamental fac- 
tor in training and preparation for citizen- 
ship since the health of the bo\' and girl 
materiall\' determines endurance, disposition 
and attitude, and endurance, disposition and 
attitude \itally alTect happiness and effi- 
ciency. 

2. That in the training and preparation 
for citizenship the school is as much respon- 
sible for the preser\ation and protection of 
the child's health and de\elopment of his 
ph\'sical efiicienc>' and well-being as it is in 
the guidance and training of his mental 
attainments. 

3. That an abundance of radiating health 
and physical well-being is of more import- 
ance to the class room teacher than in an 
intlividual in any other profession, since an 
example in well-being is an incentive of 
greatest importance in Health Education, 
anil an unhealth\' teacher cannot be in com- 
plete sympathy with the attitude and dis- 
position of live, healthy, out-door-minded 
bo>s and girls. 



DEPARTMENT OV- IIO.ME 
ECONOMICS 

The students welcomed the return of 
Bertha L. Nixson last year, head of the de- 
partment, who had been absent on a \ear's 
leave which included study at Columbia 
and a summer's travel and study in Europe. 

.Miss Nona Isabel Jordan is the clothing 
specialist. She is a graduate of Drake Uni- 
\ersity and Columbia. 

While the primar\' purpose of the depart- 
ment is the training of teachers of home 
economics we are anxious to serve the ever 
increasing numbers of general students who 
are becoming more and more interested in 
the various phases of home economics. Sev- 
eral new courses have been introduced and 
a new minor for the general students has 
been added to the curriculum. 

Through the efforts of the students in the 
department the administration has sponsor- 
ed a practice house for the major and minor 
students of home economics. Six students 
ami a faculty representative enjo>' the com- 
forts of home along with its responsibilities. 




25 





Florence M. Sublette, B.S., A.M. 



A. L. Heer, a. 



M. A., Ph.D. 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 
EDUCATION 

Since September, 1927, there has been much 
expansion in this department. Two full- 
time instructors, one in the College and one 
in the Training School, aided by part-time 
instructors in piano and voice, formed the 
staff of 1927. September, 1928, saw the ad- 
dition of one instructor, Mr. Steere; and 
with September, 1929, came two more. Miss 
Littlejohn and Mr. Metcalf. The present 
staff is composed of five full-time instructors 
and a part-time instructor in voice. One 
room was used by the department in 1927. 
Since then we have grown until four rooms 
are necessary to provide for our activities. 
With new teachers and new equipment has 
come the opportunity to offer not oni a 
major and a minor in the department but 
to take our places alongside some of our 
sister colleges in offering a four-year degree 
course in Music Education. In this one year 
more than a dozen students have enrolled in 
the department for these advanced courses. 
We realize that with this growth come new 
responsibilities. May we ever do more to 
make music a vital part in the life of this 
community, and through teachers who are 
keenly alive, may reach the hearts of chil- 
dren and thus have a widespread influence 
throughout all of north-eastern Ohio. 



TRAINING SCHOOL 

The training department at present is re- 
sponsible for the courses in observation and 
in practice teaching. It is the purpose of 
the course in observation to integrate the 
various principles taught in psychology, 
classroom-management, and methods, and 
give them meaning by observing teaching 
and learning. It also aims to give the pros- 
pective teacher an opportunity to use these 
principles in analyzing teaching and learn- 
ing in the class room as a prsparation for 
actual teaching. It is here that the prospec- 
tive teacher attempts to apply principles in 
actual teaching and learning situations. 
Here the teacher is directed in acquiring 
those class room procedures which are ef- 
fective in teaching. 

Not all of the practice teaching is being 
done in the campus training school. At 
present the elementary schools in the City 
of Kent and the Franklin Township schools 
are being used for practice teaching. This 
year a supervisor has been added to the 
training school faculty who supervises the 
practice teaching done in off campus schools. 



26 






C. F. RuMOLD. A.B., LL.B. 



G. I Iazei. Swan, B.S. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL 
SCIENCES 

The Department of Physical Sciences at 
Kent State College offers in regular courses 
102 term hours in Chemistry and 3U term 
hours in Ph.\sics. In addition special courses 
are arranged for students who have the 
necessary preparation for profitably pur- 
suing the work. Students who are working 
off pre-medical or engineering requirements 
here find exactly the work they need. The 
earlier courses are presented with emphasis 
on the method of teaching these fundamen- 
tal sciences. It is intended to gi\e in these 
courses the training in the presentation of 
the facts and principles which will equip 
one for successfull>' teaching these sciences 
in the high schools. Those students who are 
looking forward to careers in the applied 
sciences will find in the more advanced 
courses work tqui\alent to similar courses 
in the colleges and universities. Eaboratory 
facilities are unexcelled and much emphasis 
is given to individual laboratory work. 



KINDERGARTEN-PR I. \1AR^ 
DEPARTMENT 

It is \ery gratifying to announce that the 
Kindergarten-Primar\' Department now has 
twenty-two students registered for three and 
four year work. 

All of these students are acti\'e members 
of the Kindergarten-Primary Club which 
was organized in February, 192'). Ihe aim 
of this group is to help in ever\' \\a\ pos- 
sible the Nurser\- - Kindergarten - Primary 
causes or the work with \oung children. 
The club has a number of interesting plans 
for the >'ear to render ser\ice. 

This student club is a branch of Ihe In- 
te' lational Kindergarten I nion and is one 
ol ' few student branches belonging to the 
international body. Last May the club sent 
two delegates to the international meetings 
at Rochester, New ^'ork. This year it is 
sending one to Memphis, Tennessee. 

It is the hope of the department that an- 
other instructor ma\- be added soon so that 
all the courses of the department nia>' be 
given to keep this fine, earnest group of 
twenty-two young women. 




27 





Margaret Dunbar, B.L. 



H. A. Cunningham, B.S., M.A. 



THE LIBRARY- 

During the last week of August, 1929, the 
library of Kent State College was moved 
from the Administration Building where it 
had had its home for twelve years to the 
new David Ladd Rockwell Building which 
had been especially designed and built to 
house it and to provide a pleasant place in 
which it might be used. 

The buildmg has proved well fitted to 
the purpose for which it was planned and 
dedicated; its beauty is a joy to every stu- 
dent; its proportions, colors, ample light, 
heat, ventilation, and noiseless floors unob- 
trusively give comfort and pleasure to 
everyone who uses it. 

The library, now numbering over forty 
thousand volumes, is growing to meet the 
new requirements of the College and with 
adequate appropriations which will be made 
from time to time will be able to meet the 
needs of students in all courses and to sup- 
ply also recreational reading. 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

There are many big themes in biology; 
one of which is the "Behavior of Organ- 
isms". Human education, since it deals 
with ways and means of modifying the be- 
havior of conscious human beings, is really 
one subdivision of biology. Every one should 
be interested in making a superior adjust- 
ment to his environment; in adjusting his 
environment to himself; and in understand- 
ing, and influencing, at times the behavior 
of others. 

The prospective teacher is immediately in- 
terested in biology as a fundamental aid in 
the solution of classroom behavior problems 
and "as an introduction to such subjects 
as hygiene, nature study, physical education, 
psychology, and child study." Biology is 
prevocational to such other occupations as 
agriculture, dentistry, medicine, forestry, 
etc., because these occupations are based 
upon fundamental laws and principles of 
biology. 



28 






J. E. MAubE, M.A., D.C.L. 



Emmf.t Stopher, A.B., A.M. 



DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 
AND FINANCE 

I he modern business world is based upon 
a money economy. As our country becomes 
more industrialized, business forges ahead 
more and more as a distinctive field. In 
fact business is showing signs of becoming 
a profession. To meet these new conditions 
scientific training is mandatory. The old 
apprenticeship system required too much. 
It was inefficient in that it lacked standard- 
ization which is necessar\' in modern mass 
production. 

.Again, the old education was largel.\' cul- 
tural. It was for the gentleman. Today 
one must commercialize his educ.ition. In 
other words it must make him a lising. 
Then it is imperative that one be specificallx 
qualified to do something well. 

For these reasons a commercial education 
should receive the serious attention of every 
young man and voung woman in choosing 
their life work, it maj' be used in the pro- 
fession of teaching or in a business career. 
In either case a college training in business 
is a gilt-edge investment and opens up limit- 
less opportunities professionally anti finan- 
cially. 



DEPARTMENT OF 
TEACHER-PLACEMENT AND 
E.XTRA-MURAL ACTI\ ITIl-S 

The activities of this depiirtment may be 
classed as: 

1. Teacher-Placement 

2. Super\ision of recent graduates in 

the field 

3. Directing home stud\ department 

4. .Arranging for extension class centers 
r .Alumni activities 

(V Field relations 

During the spring and summer terms, a 
\er\' large part of the time is given to a sur- 
vey of teaching needs and a study of the 
qualifications of candidates. .Ml members 
of the present graduating class are urged to 
enroll with the Teacher-Placement Bureau. 
Its advice and help is available also to for- 
mer graduates and undergraduates. 

An elTort is made to make a continuous 
check-up on graduates. It is hoped that 
the college will be able to publish a directory 
of all gradiiates some time next \ear. 




29 




Mkri.e Wagoner, B.S. in Agr. 

HEAD COACH 

I believe that the year 1931 will go down 
in the athletic history of Kent State College 
as the one of greatest achievement. While 
our teams have made a creditable showing 
in competition, our greatest achievement has 
undoubtedly come through the efforts of 
the Athletic Committee in obtaining a mem- 
bership in the Ohio Athletic Conference of 
Colleges. Early in October, 1929, Dr. De 
Weese and Mr. Davey attended a meeting 
of this conference and presented our case, 
v.ith the result that we as a College were 
granted the customary probationary mem- 
bership of one year, after which we automa- 
tically became a member in full standing. 
This Conference is composed of n group of 
Colleges such as Akron, Mt. Union, Hiram, 
Oberlin, and other leading Colleges of the 
state, which have organized for the advance- 
ment of the type and quality of intercolleg- 
iate athletics in the State of Ohio. This 
means that for the first time in its history 
Kent State College has an athletic eligi- 
bility rule, the one year residence rule, and, 
above all, competes with other Colleges in 
this district and state on an equal footing. 



30 






MR. PAKE 



.MISS .ME^'ER 




MISS GOWANS 





MR. ALTMAN.N 



MR, METCALF 




31 





AIR. BEGALA 



MR. HELTER 




.MR. IIARBOLRT 





MR, RENKERT 



MR. MUSSELMAN 



32 






DR. STEWARl 



MR. McVEY 




MR. FR.\NCIS 





MR. D.-WhN 



MR. I3[:CK 




33 





MISS THURSTON 



MR. HARSH 




MR. MEYER 





MISS SMITH 



MR. STEER 



34 






i?s5:ii?> 



MR DAMAXN 



MRS. BONSALL 




MISS \i-;nni-;r 





MR^, APIM U 



MISS KOLIII 




35 





MISS II^ATT 



MR. SATlERFltLD 




MISS HERRIFF 





MISS FLETCHER 



MISS COSTLEY 



36 






i5i^:ii^ 



MISS STRAIGHT 



MISS l-ENTON 




MISS PRHEMAN 





MISS KING 



MISS RICHARDS 




37 





MRS. IRWIN 



jmrs. fellers 




MISS PARSONS 





MR. CLARK 



MISS DUNBAR 



38 






«s5ii^ 



MISS HAZEN 



MISS LINK 




MISS BAUCIIMAN 





AlK. l'.K( iss 



Mi^^ Jl-I 1 Rl^V 




39 





MISS SHEPHARD 



MR. ENGLEMAN 




MR. STL MP 





MISS AUAMS 



.MISS PHILLIPS 



40 






MR. NOBLE 



MISS PARRISH 




MISS BROADBENT 





MR. COOK 



MISS SCO IT 




41 





MISS MILLER 



MR^ GRIEBLLNG 




MISS THRASHER 





MiSS SWAN 



MISS FOSTER 



42 





MISS BOSWELL 



MISS SHAW 





43 



CLASSES 



^ 



X 



\= 



x: 




~7' 



:7" 



Z7 



T 



Z7 



44 




"Then as Queen AUogia's page, 
Old in honors, young in age." 




46 




47 




Senior Class Officers 

President ---------- Watt Bair 

Vice-President ------- George Warman 

Secretary --------- Eldon Scoutten 

Treasurer ---------- James Holm 



48 




ELDON F. SCOLTTEN 

Delta Phi Sigma. Secretar.\' 3. 



President 4 ; Inti-r^ 
fraternit)' Council. President 4 : C^hesiniit Burr 2, 
3, Editor 4; Junior Class President: Senior (^lasi | 
■"■'^y^ , Secretary; Homecoming Play ?; ! nterciass Debaiii 
^^^?^'i. 2; \arsity Debate I. 1. 4. C?(p.tain 4. Alplii IMi I 
Omega: Chi Pi; Klhi Siyior'i^-2: Student Mjn.i- ' 
ger College Th'i'T-iti' ' hcniical Essa\' 1, 2, ^ ; , 

Kent, Oh^ 

Delta I^hi Sigma", 'SfccretA^(^^2^^iistorian 3, \i;e 
President 4 ; t A|fyhaJ2si Omega. W nrth\ Director 4 
\'aT?ily DebfS t:% 1; lnteicl:is> Ochate I. 2 
Chestnut Burr 2, 4, Business ManaKer_4; Home 
coming Play I. 1~ Inteifraternity CoUj^cil 3. 4 
/rreshnian Class President; Stjnioi Clas?; TVej'-incr 
Social f-ommittee 3. 4; Executive Council -1 \\\:-\ 
jniot Alan Student 3; Chi Pi: Seni<ir Pjnni C-tJiiii 




JOANf 




orrjen's League. 

PHlLlS's''^. BARin'teC 



»7'*1 1; jCdllege 1 heatre Managerial HinrJ- 



Delta Pht Sigma 




Woman's Leagu^i 



od, Ohi( 



venna. Ohic 
\ ice-Presidani U'nd President 2 
Inlcrclass Di-'balt 1, 1\ Varsjt* DeHjie 2, 3, 4 
Student t^ouncil 2. Men's Ifnimi liiurd 3; Foot 



hall 4: Chestnut Burr 



i. 4, Mclnn^; Pcit 4. 



"imww 



ARTHUR STFJSKAI North ()lm^lead. Ohic 

Delta Phi ^it^ma, Sergeant at Arms 4: Ashlant 

College: Fooiball 2, 3. 4 ; Wrestling 2. 3. 4. Cap 

t.iin I. SkiIc 175 IH. Chami^'in 3; State Heavy- 

_ \\ci«hr Champirin i; Basl^L■lbd^l 3; Hen^s^J^h©^. 




Delta Phi SigrfiJ, Trcaiuter 2; "VV resiling 
Men's Union: .Men's Chnrus. 




HAMILTON Fresno, Californic 

l3!i_ Independents; Y^AT C. A. 






49 





^ 3; Football Manager 2; Men's Chorus 1. 



;*\ 



ARTHUR PEEBLES Cuyahoga l-alls. Ohio 

, Delta Phi Sigma. Historian 4: Kent Stater 2, 3 
/ 4; Men's Chorus; Men's Union; Social ^Ommit' 
1, tec; Executive Board 4. ,;^"'='^'' 




:.. W. LUCASjl 

Men's UnlojlJ 

I 'I, 




'WALTER SHAM MO 



^Drrville, Ohio 



Jjijiependents. Secretary-Treasurer 4; Y. M. C. A. 




'pSRENCE GEHRIG Millersburg, Ohio 

Ohio State University; Men's Union^_ 



50 




r — — - — ^ 

GEORGli McCAGUE New SpringtielJ, Ohio 

Wooster College; Sigma Tau Gamma; Y. M C A. 
2. 3: Intramural Athletic Council 3; Mactv^Swim 
minR Team. /^ 






51 





;.1LL1AN' FLOWER J 

Freshman Class Stcretary; Sophomore Class Sec- 
retar\>j,. O.C, \\,. C, Secretary 3. 



'VATT BAI' 



Delta Phi Sigma'; Men's Union' Board 4: Editor 
Keritonian 2, 3 : \'jrsir\- Tennis 1, 3 : Kent Stater 
/■Qhi i.Pi 4v 





52 





;;,Best StuJenl 1. 2. ^, 4; Phi Alpha Alpha. President 
-4^ V. W. C. A.. Secrelan 4: l-rench Club. S<:cre-,. 
^1^-^': Mathematics Club 4. (>. C. W . C. V:eit^ 
^^tlent 4; Chemical fe^sav C^fii>te&t. 





A.; Women's 



.'7 

■ ^ I Ravenna. Ohio 



^1:() LOW l-.K 

l.)ell.i l^hi Si^nij . XUii'*; Lniuii; Mack's Swim- 




(I^lS^L 1 lir-RI AND 




^NETsgAV HN\S()R 11 1 DefianclTQlTO 

' Ho*Iin&^n<«HL College: Glee Club 2: "Patience' 



i5i«t?^ 





53 




^ 



^^ 



Marfan flower 



Kent, 



^-Freshman Class Treasurer: Sophomore 
Treasurer; O. C. \V. C. ; Junior Class Soeial 
[ittee. 



Ohia 

CUs^ 




GORDOl^ 



LUCILE HILI 

Women's League. 



Ravenna, Ohio 



y^ Kappa Mil Kappa. President 4; Basketball 1, 2, 
/ 3, 4; lnterfrate.pn4j,;,. CPMflpi 




/EL MA L 

Women's League, 



GEORGE \||ARMAN Windham. Ohio 

Delta Phi Sigma, Treasurer 3; Most Popular Man 
4; Homecoming Play 2; Orchestra I, 2. 3, ,4;, Band 
1, 2, 3. 4; Men's Chorus I, 2. 3. 4; All^fea Ps 
Omega: President Men's Chorus 4; Varsity^ Ten- 
nis 4; Baseball 3.v " 




-K-ap^pa— AClIKBPE^^^'^^'''^''^'^^''"'^-'*' ^^ouncit 




!S>RX)THY OTT KENT, Ohib^ 

Sigma Sigma Sigma; KinderganeniPrimary CI] 



54 





MILDReD LE1B0VIT^}\ Akron,<0fo| 

(/Y . Phi Ep^ilcn, PresiJent -1: O. C. W. C: '^ 
///^ yellenic, Sccreiatj; French Club; College Tf« 




Cent, Ohio 

, Utii Kappa; Fooibjll I, 2., 3, -t : Basket 



iM W^OW- Ravenna. Ohi6 

/Hlestcm Reserve L'niversity; O. C. \\ . C. ; \Vc - 



men'b League. 




^-ri]^^^^S5r League. , 



•ROV OBER 

.Men's Union; Wrestling 4. 



Kent, Ohio 





55 





CI lARLES^^mfBOURNH 



— "Kappa iMu Kappa: Football 1. 2, ),_^4^^^ke!^ 
ball 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 3. 



56 





'Ljflvj Randolph, Ohio 

3elra Phi Sigma: Social Committee 3 , \ ice- [^rt'si- 
teijt ^phomore Class; Senior-^rom CummiiU'e 4-; 






57 




"And Olaf's men passed far^eyond, 
Leaving them the age-old bond." 




58 




59 




Junior Class Officers 

President ---------- Clyde Hall 

Vice-President ------- William Sprague 

Secretary ---------- Mary Donze 

Treasurer - - - -- - - - Thelma Stambaugh 



(30 





Florence Hecock 
.Mabel \\ illlaavs 

.MllDKED (],U.L 



■RANK McCaSLIN 



Alice Chasey 



l:RNEST Julius 



Ada Mae Taylor 



Adoli'h Schandel 



Elsie Marxhn 




61 



^=^ 




Alberta Statts 

Edward 
Spinneweber 



Argia Ruffer 



Elmer Pettay 

Dorothy Cooper 

Edward Harris 



Mary Lossee 



Donald Robinson 



Kathryn Myers 



62 





iSS^SJ'' 



Mabel Cobb 



Charles IIickstead 



I ATT IE ScHNIEDER 



Fred Drew 



Marguerite Ovler 



James Oaton 



Lucille Iakr 



IIarley Seiss 



Helen Bunn 




63 




Ernest Pollitt Jeannette Wheeler Ralph McGinnis 



Marian Lostetter 



Herald Moore 



Florence Shader 



Marion Hunter 



Dorothy Stadler 



Orrin Smucker 



64 











Hazel Greer 


Clyde Hall 


\'iRGiNL\ Johnstone 


LUCII-LE l-.W ELL 


Geneva Brand 


Catherine C^onroy 


liow ARD 






DOBRANETSKI 


Leatha Bullock 


Merrii L Mn.LS 




65 




Cornelia Stewart 



Pauline Pardee 



Mildred Peterson 



50YD IVlILLER 



Eva Johnson 



Theodore Walter 



Louise Kist 

Alice Hinds 

Mary Beckwith 



66 





Wll.LIA.M SpRAGUE 



Robert Didha.m 



Rita Spamord 



Thel.nia Sta,\\baugh 



\lDA KuMSE 



Marian Sass 



Elton Sawyer 



Frank Ianelly 



Bessie R\.MS\^■ 




67 




Marian Sass 



A'Iargaret Carroll 



Polly Sawyer 



Iary Donze 



Cleg Crow 



Elise Russ 



Leslie Chapman 



68 




i^sSii?^ 



The College Theatre 

With the arri\'al of Professor E. Turner Stump, certain 
students interested in dramatics banded together and with the en- 
dorsement of Alpha Psi Omega, the national honorars' dramatic 
fraternity, appointed Eldon Scoutten to present a petition to the 
president asking the establishment of a college theatre. 

The petition was favorabl\' received and the theatre was 
founded with o\er one hundred and (ift\- charter members. Tak- 
ing the advantage of the excellent facilities offered in the new 
college stage the group produced the "Melting Pot" amid great 
acclamation and approval. 

This marks the first step in a truly democratic group of dra- 
matic players. The successes of the group in future \ears lies 
entirely in the hands of the students who are left. The senior 
class of 1^)31 trusts that they will not fail to carry the good work 
on to its utmost completion. 




09 




"Blinded by the light that glared. 
They stood in little groups mid stared.' 




70 




71 




Sophomore Class OfFicers 

President --------- Don Housley 

Vice-President - - D. C. Abbott 

Secretary --------- Anne Conrad 

Treasurer ---------- Joe Kelley 




mS¥mSl 




Louise Hamilton 


\\\ U. ^lckn^..M 


Ik-k-ii B....M.' 


Knlll \\..lkTll~ 


\i-liu- W.iiuk 


MiMuJ I..IUN 


William I.ane 


Margaret Roberts 


Helen Knox 


Arthur Steere 


(.ilad> s ShaelTcr 


Mildre.l i;labauKh 


Agnes Montgomery 


lidwanl Stone 


LIvira l-isher 


Myrtle Heard 


1). A. Grubb 


Mildred Shilling 


)ohn Burger 


Clara Rahy 


L;iizabeth Kepko 


Glen l-arringlon 


Donna tieorgeric 


Marian Lane 


Jeanctle Riddle 


J. II. Willclls 


Amelia \esy 


llarrv R utter 


1). C. Abhoxx 


ALirgarct Porter 


Gertrude /.arin 


Katherine Wunderlich 


lidith Petre 


Maxine HenderNon 


Kuth Snedeker 


I-ranklin W illiams 


Delbert Wishart 


Lucille Krediacs 


l-.dith Avery 


Helen Meming 


Lois Scott 


\ iolet Gallabreese 



73 




Agnes Miller 
Mildred Pyle 
Margaret Melin 
Elosie Dawes 
Susanne Kenash 
Francis Mericola 
Anna Gow 



Kalhrvn Fahndrich Florence Bodman Leota Merrill 



.M,i 



1 . 



Ruth Swaney 
Anne Kopcial 
Joseph Nappi 
Lillian Somnitz 
Clara Seymour 
Ruth Blazek 



Susie Palfi 
Frances Falconer 
Margery Deisman 
Silvia Schlott 
Anna Crum 
Audrey Brostek 



Edna Eaton 
Helen Derr 
Doris Cavenaugh 
Belma DePord 
Helen McCandless 
Roy Gilmore 



Mae Kerr 
Nesta Cornsey 
Anne Burger 
Mildred Bremer 
Alice Bartholomew 
Rose Halech 



Ethel Mayer 
Katherine Schaab 
Mildred Stillwagon 
Verna Leiser 
Virgil Cobb 
Alice Laird 
Alice Borex 



74 




Winifred Bullcr 


Aulen Vockev 


liLinche Marner 


Freda !k'\ man 


Shirley Goodwin 


Kermit Taylor 


Marv Irwin 


Naudcan Johnson 


Doroihv Jackson 


James Shelley 


/elma Zost 


Irene Thorne 


l-.UKcnc Traxler 


Marv Shocklev 


Mvron Warnes 


Pearl I-reeman 


Ardis Reichard 


Mar_\ ALicayko 


MililrctI Kingdom 
I:dwin Hirt 
Dorothy Quinlan 
Helen Holloway 


(da\'lon Aldcn 
n(inilh\ Mackcy 
I'nul Karper 
Ruth Reichard 


Kuth Apley 
MitrKuerite Holmes 
\ irginia Lyons 
l-aye Henderson 


Minnie liruderly 
Adelaide Baker 
Anne (lonrad 
Bllcn Lawrence 


(larl IMcnnincr 
Blanche Hillman 
Arthur 1 timpach 
Lois Briggs 


Marian lulmer 
William l:dmislon 
l-lsic Crcwson 
Arlic Hickman 



/> 




Mari;ni l-ric lul 
Alva Sapp 
Celestine W'eisman 
Harold Jones 
Helen Frey 
Walter HagerJon 
Fred Scott 



Wiimer P.ttter^u 
Mary Calabria 
Fred Kloha 
Laura Limbert 
Merle Leggitt 
Maxine Ratheiis 
Helen Skinner 



Jl;^ML■ Shull 

Florence Wooll 
Ruth McGregor 
Lucille Ober 
Flelen Zeh 
Geraldine Williams 
Edith Olives 



( J.ira Winkler 
Llizabeth Williams 
Harriette Wilson 
Jeanette Vients 
Mildred Sheldon 
Mardella Near 
Hazel Johnson 



Evelyn Da\is 
Marguerite Waller 
Anna Hunyady 
Chloris Taylor 
Ruth Cuthbert 
Freda Lang 
Molly Thompson 



F.dward .Merrell 
Adelaide Walker 
Russell Gardner 
Molly Brand 
Chester Dunlavey 
Dorothy Stallsmith 
Paul Wood 



76 




Hcrnice Stewart 


Alice Stoner 




Dorothv McClellant 


|-:velvn Harrold 


Alealh Corbetl 


Cdadvs lleinlen 


Arlcin Brown 


l-:klred Miller 




Kulh Nile> 


Pauline Deal 


Helen Newman 


lulward Meecham 


Esther Kesilev 


Lillian Bailev 




Kiith l^^i^lev 


Katherine Koont/ 


llo Henderson 


(dad> s Carmellu 


HMzabelh Rulcher 


Martha Raumh 


rucr 


Itlhel F:tlling 


l:mma Hosier 


Josephine lto^;an 


Ireda Berber 


Ired Swartz 


Thelma Kent 




Ann Sula 


(Uilh Mvers 


Marjoric Russell 


Pearl Hadlock 


Kov Henderson 


Katherinc (^ummiiiK 


Marv Mclntirc 


Doris Dean 


Dorothv Mack 


Allen Mi/er 


»-r.incc5 \\t»s 


Donald (ilimei 




Alberla Clark 


Sarah llallaKher 


Dellu-rt (dine 


Martha Durbin 



// 



t 




Sylvia KangaskosUi 
Lawrence Phillips 
Isabel Barber 
Joseph Andraski 
Freda Schneider 
Eleanor Mansfield 
Don Housley 



Rose Donate 
Harriette Patterson 
Karl Falls 
Ruth Foreman 
Rose Marinelli 
Howard Hopper 
Virginia Dance 



Susanne Adams 
C. E. Atkinson 
Victorine Moses 
Michael Maro 
Gertrude McKeown 
Molly Domenico 
Lois Scott 



Matthew Flower 
Mary Newton 
Earl Russell 
Anne Sloan 
Louis Parenti 
Lucille Dickerhoffe 
Marie Jeppe 



Helen Kasopf 
William Disbro 
Mary Rapasky 
Larry Nicholson 
Nadine Crosby 
Leonard Baker 
Bessie McDermott 



Joe Kelley 
Fannie Rice 
James Rech 
Agnes Albright 
Merle Baker 
Florence Haley 
Arthur Hommel 



78 




^s?> 



Margaret PIcps 


l-Kira Sick.ifnose 


l-ois Burner 


I lien Griffith 


[ohn Snvder 


Ruth Bnrnshaw 


Garnet Long 


Mildred Kfcnev 


jean Uen>lev 


ILi^el Voung 


Thelm:i \\ agoiicr 


Antonelte Veirano 


Bernice Hochstettcr 


John Men^ler 


Marv Hughes 


Kuih Pekarek 


Rose AranotT 


R.ilh Headlev 


(Catherine Nunnjilv 


joe r.arl 


Mary Getfcr 


Pauline Terrctl 


Olga Burick 


Margaret Ackcrman 


Rujsell Muster 


Helen Spring 


Vera Brown 


l.avonda Baughm.n 


Rthel Ford 


Kenneth Oyeter 


Loleila Rule 


Gcraldine Osborne 


Thelma Hazclitt 


Anlhonv Ross 


.\!arv Perkins 


\ita Baysinger 


Elizabeth Meade 


Catherine Brah.im 


Helen MacCurdy 


Mary Bantum 


Ruth Lytle 


Thelma Grafton 



79 




Mildred lenkins 


Geneva Byers 


Irene Ma\es 


Marie Walsh 


Ruth Adiard 


Agnes Henning 


Eleanore HofTman 


Dorothv Rose 


Freda Lang 


Ruth Joy 


Mildred Thomas 


Geneva Pott^ 


Marguerite Schmid 


Anna Schroeder 


Katherine V'olosin 
Marian Mouat 


Ruth Caughey 
Wanda Bussard 


Mary Mauro 


Madeline Reets 



•)^]H:^«" 



80 



Lrrors-- 

Lirrors — big ones and little ones — common ones and rare ones 
— avoidable and una\oidable — the_\' are all here. \'our name ma\' 
be misspelled. Vour picture ma\' be misplaced. Vou may feel 
insulted. But please do not. 

We have given \'ou the best book that we could produce. We 
believe that it is a worthy volume. There have been many people 
handling the production of this book ami with many people there 
are always many errors. 

There ha\e been many forces working against us. Fraternity 
politics, facult}' dissension and e\en student jealousies have com- 
bined to make the production of this book a thing of difficulty. 
Therefore we ask \ou t(j bear with us and to overlook the errors 
which \ou fmd. 

THE EDITORS 



M 



81 




love.' 



82 




83 




Freshman Class Officers 

President --------- Russell Brooks 

Vice-President ------- Elizabeth Reufner 

Secretary -_-- Joe Day 

Treasurer ----- .-.- Beull Stringer 



84 




KiihvMcllouKh CiLTtrudc Wnrren l:lsie Cole 

Pauline Whilman Lucille Calloway l-rancis Binkley 

Kulh WevBant Marlene Kcllt-x Dorolhv Seilerl 

Sam Cipriano Glade Bavne I-rank Julian 

MarKaret MnJcnIucker Duane Baker Helen Dunslan 



llarr\' Williams 
Maxine Tittle 
Kaymond PloURh 



riorence Keifaber John llorninK 



Koberl tiihstm 
William Heber 
Mildred Knisely 
Nailean Schumacker 
l<ilL-\ Hunk 
Helen Dunlap 



lieornia Richard 

Roberta Black 

Clarence Cummintts I'.iidine ( aldwell 



K.ilhleen Barnar.l Kalherinc Harrison 
Marv \\hiiecc;n<.n IliAibeth Kufcncr 



Colletta Stephens Catherine Hancock Henderson Clav 
Bernice W ilczak V). I-.. W hile Masine Moore 



Cieorfte l-nsin^er 
D.u-olhv Stadlcr 
1 arl I vans 
I'aul Sirahl 
Donald Alderman 



\ iola Drown 
S, J bear 
Marie DishonK 
IU-rn\ \\ inecop 
I ouise Sause 



Marietta Decker 
Mar\ W iuKer 
,\iar> Sneidcr 
Newman Carr 
Ralph Hamheck 
Bernice Pannier 



85 





Jay Littlepage Marian Masher Allen Weniger 



Fay Lantzer 
Kenneth Myers 
Ruth Harris 
George King 
Lenore Kellog 
Leona Keehle 
Lillian Case 



John Hastings 
Dorothy Postich 
J. B. Stevens 
Doroth\' Papp 
Grace Hoenshie 
Claudia Cle\enger 
Mildred Hall 



La Verne Solomon 
Kenneth Wiechel 
Kathryn Wenhart 
Edmund Kuhn 
Marian I ngalls 
Elizabeth Barnhouse 
Evelyn Dick 



Sarah Morgan 
Fianklin Day 
Florence Flower 
Donald Cook 
Elizabeth Wilson 
Ethel Klesa 



Richard Mansfield 
Dorothy Walter 
Lemo Christian 
Mary Jane Manchester 
Frank Weiss 
Lorna Southart 



Barbara Engleman Dorothy Sylvester 
Esther Foot Elizabeth Norris 



Audrey Ford 
Stephen Toma 
Maxine Cobb 
Harry Kirk 
Helen Sloan 
Mable Battles 
Pauline Stonehill 



Lewis Hist 
I mogene Singer 
|ohn Ryzna 
Ruth Randall 
Louise Huge 
Fern Lower 
\ irginia StofTer 



Harriette Crawford Mary Moore 




Helen K.il.ifus 
Joyce Lowe 
Barbara Pelre 
Louise Henderson 
Helen Burgell 
Pearl Chubb 
Harriet Percival 
Gladys Moffet 



leannc Kinch 
Vera Mathews 
(ilal.i>^ Moore 
Kathr\ n f-aulk 
Mildred KreiJer 
[■veKn Morgan 
[ieul'ah Iritt 
Louise Grove 



Maxine Beyer 
lames NeUlen 
Betty Soskin 
Laurel Haule>" 
Isabel Jones 
lohn Hartle 



Arlhur W illis 
Kathrvn Newder 
Robert t^harpence 
I)(}rothv Clark 
Richard Kinney 
Louise Howen 



Llizabeth W ilson I ower KelloR^ 
J. T. Klein Winifred Lhrich 



Hulh Mover Lillian Newman Helen Hoffman 

Helena K'ossman Alice Turner l-.velyn Kelfer 

Gerirude Ward Winifred Remick Ruth Konp 

Waller Dav Lauretta I adritck Mildred Horst 

Mary Buss LuRenia Brown Luis laulkner 

lane Callahan Louise lleide L;ii/abeih Wilson 

Adeline Rolondi Maxine Miller Lunice Hines 

.\tarv Quealy Blanche Urban 



87 




Alice Rudder 
Lilsie Stocker 
Alary McGuire 
Rose Molle 
Maxine Lechleitner 
Kathrs'n Detrow 
Marjorie King 
Lucille McKeisnan 



Eliith Scott 
Mrs. Anna Klein 
Sarah Fink 
Alice Wootspolus 
Laduska Mathews 
Ruth Zerbe 
Sarah Straisma 
Margaret Acken 



Mary Harding 

Gerald L,eonari.i 
lanet Jones 
Selah "Straight 
Minnie Doll 
Thomas Jenkins 



Pete Cipriano 
Pansy Frvett 
G. N. Beil 
Helen Hawkins 
Forest Hawk 
Anne Munlear 



Florence Lewandosky Louis Egerer 
Deloras Zimmerman Adeline Kellogg 



Vest Tryon 
jeannette Carl 
Yelta Snyder 
Charles Hagerty 
Francis Scalise 
Burnett Capusell 
Miss Barnard 
Harrold Gear 



Goldie Vianis 
Mary Myler 
W'ilma Quinly 
Stella Hudons 
Evelyn Volty 
Gladys Summers 
Bettv Anderson 
Clara Hutf 



Ellen Wengert 
Dolcie Murphv 
Elizabeth Neiudorf 
Elizabeth Beavis 
Helen Shield 
Mary Stoner 
Elizabeth Kline 
Elizabeth Noel 




M 



liurton Bell 
Amelia Gelbke 
(ieorge luilne 
Sarah Hurd 
Ruih Wagar 
\Vilda Strausse 
Bernice Shaffer 
Charles Demian 



Josephine lalt 
I:lmer Dunlave>' 
Adeline \\ ikc)\ 
Marv \\ hite 
ina Butler 
loseph Da\' 
\ ifKinia Kussell 
Doris Grauet 



Gii> Arussi 
t)(iroth\ Shrum 
Oscar \\ aller 
Jei'n Baer 
C^orrinne D(»dd 
Kalhryn \\ orts 
Wargjret \ an W inUU 
Gladvs Moiire 



Margaret Topliff 
|nhn \\ iison 
Arline F-ohl 
Kose W inke 
l)(iruih\ i:spenchieJ 
luli.i \ an (!ourl 
William Shipman 
Madeline Thompson 



(:ii\c liikens Mac Slaven 

Margaret Wei/ne^ker l:arl W right 



Kobert Mill 
Martha In 



JSt 



l_. W . Starncr 
Hazel \ incent 
Margaiet Armilage 
Aletha Kager 
Grace Van Dorslen 
Virginia Mansfield 



Dorothy Boardman Winlon Cornish 



Kuth Johnson 
Mary Parks 
Marie Sandrock 
Lucille Pierce 
( !aiherine Phillip; 



Genevieve McNeil 
Marthena Di\er 
l-thyl Schremer 
I ucille Price 
Buell Stringer 




Robert Muilett 


Alice Gallowav 


Frances GrifTith 


\\'a\ne Na\'ior 


Marv Stotts 


Rav Nesbitt 


Virginia Stam 


Helen Heckathorn 


Ruth Timpe 


Marv Horner 


Lillian Janson 


David Nelson 


Edith Stace 


lohn Cole 


1-annv Ventresco 


bugene McAbee 


Svlvia Allan 


Marv Archer 


Cletus Edwards 


Adaline Heller 


Georgia Prichard 


losephine Reed 


Hazel Jones 


Louise Bologna 


Dorothv Wilkin 


Lois Akers 


iessie Roderick 


Virginia Lvthe 


Ilanna Schotsch 


Muriel Fischel 


Laurence Hartzell 


Alvce Rieglet 


Eleanor Yocum 


Trami Kosola 


Marian Jones 


Catherine Clark 


Anna Ross 


Margeurite Daershug 


Beulah Newton 


Elizabeth Kellogg 


Emmaline Hart 


Mildred Cramer 


Helen Abel 


Svlvia Allen 


Rose Minke 


Nellie Naragon 


leanette \ an Meet 


Stella Roth 


Evelvn Yountz 


Vesta Donaldson 


liernice Hoslield 


Dorothy Gamble 


Lena Heidelberg 


L\'nn Hodgins 


Gertrude Starr 





90 




Dorothy McKenney 
Beull Stringer 
luanita Diver 
Maxinc Bo> d 
Dorothy lirenisen 
Martha Brodheck 
\irKinia Musit 
Gladys Maffett 



KobLTi BKUu- 
Htlcn I ocke 
Anna Matnni 
|-.li/ab*;th Crawford 
Ru?isel (Irugcr 
Rose /urbuch 
Mary Guillet 
Grace Nagle 



i:the! Palsy 
I rancis Green 
Kuth (^ondo 
Susie L'rban 
Ruth Lioicr 
Dorothy W'allis 
Ruth Loomis 
Ruth Harrum 



Kenneth Hissner 
llorcnce .Wclnerny 
Phehe Kissinger 
A^nes Lozier 
Priscilla Price 
Irene Polen 
Marcel la Ru%h 
Elizabeth Schoff 



laith Spellman 
Russell Brooks 
.Wary Beck 
Plcanor Disbro 
Anna P.vans 
Kenneth Bell 
luanita Preshly 
Lucille Buizer 



Robert Mullett 
(^orenne Dodil 
Grace (.^linker 
Mabel (!romwell 
Martha Walker 
Anna Tescher 
Ldna Gheadle 
hmilic I'cilding 



l:stelle \\ elser 
Paul Barr 
Bernice Knistev 
Mabel Smith 
Ruth Pollock 
Jessie Preeman 
Kathryn Kenncy 
Mary Long 



91 




Arthur McPeek 
Mary Ra>en 
William Martin 
Bessie Spellman 
Billy Langell 
Mari' Mc Kenny 
Price Chamberlain 
Mary Findley 



Mabel Smith 
Dean Gintert 

Ingrid Smerling 
Dean Marshall 
Helen Rutledge 
Don Straub 
Clarabel Spacht 
Mildred Horst 



Corvin Gehrig 
Thelma Brokaw 
Kennon Callahan 
Betty Moore 
Elwood Miller 
Pauline Long 
Nelson Gauger 
Marie Boron 



luanita Di\er 
\\ illiam Saare 
Estelle Brown 
Willis Janson 
Kathleen Crile 
Clark Musser 
Martha Nogal 
Olive AUeman 



Harold Schamp 
Clara Kosman 
Charles Focht 
Elizabeth Foster 
Dale Bowman 
Marcellain Kroft 
Thomas Carothers 
Doris Clark 



Dorothy Stoffer 
Charles Glatzer 
Isabel Kirkland 
Alton Schopfer 
Jean Baumberger 
Fred Hanni 
Hazel Kaufman 
Ruth Reese 



Ivan Shilliday 
Kalhryn Horst 
Charles Strater 
Norma Grossklaus 
Norman Chaffin 
Dama McVey 
Ruth Hoffman 
Evelyn Brillhart 



92 




Iler\e> Stahi Ha:el Resler \\'es!e>' Rrittan Mildred Ross James W'arthen Barbara \\ hidden .Maijorie Wiiudin 

Mildred Jones Frances McC^lelland Mary Jane Wild Josephine Wright Martha Imhoff Phvllis Jenkins Alice Lewis 

William Heyde Margaret Wagner Bonnie Hart Pauline Culbison Ruth Shreve Mar\' Watelskey Iris Phillips 




93 



ATHLETICS 



x: 



^ 




:/ 



zr 



'y 



~z 



17 



94 




mM 





Coach Merle E. Wagoner 

Of the several things of w hich Kent State may justly be proud 
is the fact that a man such as Coach Wagoner is at the helm of 
the athletic ship. With unwavering courage, keen insight into 
human problems and a firm resolve to put our athletics on a 
higher plane, he has endeared himself to every student in this 
college. 





Assistant Coach Joe Begala 

Coach Begala has made himself felt in more ways than one, 
and (2oach Wagoner is to be complimented upon securing such a 
man as an assistant. Begala's wrestling teams ha\'e won state anil 
national recognition, and he is responsible fcir the splendid show- 
ing of the football line tluring the past two }ears. 




97 



If 




Arlein Brown 



Lcis Scott 



Ruth Wacar 



Cheerlead 



ers 



Kent State has never had a real live cheering section. Now 
and then a few patriotic students will gather about one of the 
above and emit a few attempts at cheering. Cheering may help 
the team and again it may not. The fact remains, however, 
that whether or not it aids the team, it is a great satisfaction to the 
cheerleaders to hear a hearty response to their eiforts. Of course 
the best sort of cheering and that which encourages the teams 
most, is not the mechanical yells directed by a convulsive auto- 
maton, but a real spontaneous outburst which is not given at the 
plea of the cheerleader but at the instigation of one's emotion. 
The cheerleaders are a hardworking crew and their assignment is 
not easily filled. Hence they deserve our full support. 



98 




i 



I Iarley Seiss 



William Edmiston 




Robert Blvthe 



Manasers 



'I lie underdog at an athletic contest al\va\'s gets a big hand 
and lots of encouragement. But the real underdog is unknown 
to the audience. Who is it that toils long after the team has gone 
home, in cleaning up the rooms which they ha\e used? Who is 
it that runs his legs oflf at the commands of exeryone from the 
president to the janitor? It is not the coach. It is the poor, toil- 
ing manager. Theirs is the only true part in the game. They 
don't play for public applause. Thev don't get paid. Now anil 
then the\- get a letter. The\- work just as hard as the team. The}- 
wi>rk longer. Wkv are the real heroes of our athletic s\stem. 




99 




"As one who from a Tolnme reads 
lie spake of heroes and their deeds' 




100 




101 




Varsity Football Squad, 1930 

Front RoiL': Coach Begala, Edmiston, Head Coach Wagoner, Seiss, Sickman, 
Lane. 

Second Row: Hagerdon, Shelley, Baker, Taylor, Hickstead, Hall, Kilbourne, 
Fannelly, Nicholson, Mericola, Carl. 

Third Row: Nappi, Baker, Barry, Menster, Broz, Housley, Miller, Nicker- 
son, Scoutten, Abbott. 

Fourth Row: Baughman, Willetts, Mhj.s, Climes, Stejskal. Disbro, Mer- 
rell, Taylor, Secrist. 



102 




R< 



reason i\cview 



Kent State 6 — Mt. Union 18 

Kent State 6 — Akron 12 

Kent State — Case 6 

Kent State 0— Ashland 

Kent State 6 — Hiram 

Kent State 26 — Capitol 

Kent State 13 — Defiance 6 

Summarizing the season does not result in such a poor conclusion when one 
considers the calibre of the teams which our varsit)' met — and conquered. 

Last year was the first season in which Kent played as a member of the Ohio 
Conference, it is one of which to be proud. The Golden Flashes of last year 
were the finest group that this college has ever produced. 

Mt. L'nion. fresh from a defeat at the hands of O. S. U. experienced great diffi- 
cultv in downing the fighting team from Kent. Akron found an unexpected tartar 
in our team and won only after two freak runs on the part of their one-man team. 
Case of Cle\'eland which had been romping through opponents in an easy stvle, 
was hard pushed to beat our men b\' one touchdown. 

Ashland trounced thirteen Ohio teams but could not even score on us. Capitol 
U was rounding out an undefeated season when Kent stepped in and ruined an 
otherwise perfect home-coming day by scoring a real victory to the tune of 26-0. 
Hiram offered little resistance and were it not for the oozy field we would have 
beaten them \-et more severely. Defiance met us for our home-coming game and 
they were repulsed, 13-6. 

Three wins, as many losses and one tie gives us the respectable average of .500 
for the season with a total of 57 points scored against 42 of the opposition. 

The speedy backfield stars including, "Cocky" Kilbourne. "Art" Stejskal, 
"Deke" Abbott, "Phil" Barry and "Bill" Disbro, made more first downs than the 
opposition in every game but two. 

The defensive power of the team was a big asset. The five center men on the 
line have been characterized as the best in Ohio. They were K. Ta\lor, Fannelly, 
jMerrell, Sapp and Shelle\-. The group of ends played no small part in the success 
of the team. Stellar performances were turned in b\' Housely, W. Taylor. Hager- 
don. Hall and Hicksted. 

Four stars are lost by graduation: Kilbourne, Sapp, Stejskal and Barr\-. 
Kilbourne is one of the best fullbacks in the country. Sapp is material for an all- 
Ohio selection. Stejskal wrought havoc with all opponents lines and is one of the 
greatest line-plungers in the state. Barry was a seasonal find and in one game 
gained an average of seven yards every time he carried the ball. 

Prospects for another season are bright an\how. The freshman squad, coached 
b\- Lennie Brickman, has a wealth of material and should produce some future 
stars. Gear, Kinnev, Stahl, Heber, Johnson and llissner showed up well in the 
scrimmages against the varsit\-. An impressive schedule has been arranged for 
next season and we ma\' well be optimistic. 




103 





"Art" Stejskal 

North Olmstead, O.; Senior; Halfback; Weight 180. 

The Powerhouse oj the Kent Attack. 



"Cocky" Kilbourne 

Kent, O.; Senior; Fullback; Weight 185. 

Kent's Greatest Fullback. 



"Phil" B.4rry 

Ravenna, 0.; Senior; Halfback; Weight 155. 

Kent's Fighting Redhead. 



"Pete" Sapp 

Kent, O. ; Senior; Tackle; Weight 170. 

A Tower of Strength for Four Years. 




Kermit Taylor 

Kent. O.; Sophomore; Guard: Weight Itt. 

The Wildcat of the Line. 



"Bill" Disbro 

Mayfielcl, O. ; Sophomore; Halfback; Weight 170. 

The Speedy Ground-gainer. 



"Deke" Abbott 
Findla\', O. ; Sophomore; Quarterback; Weight 16t. 
Our Great Defensive Threat. 



"Ji.m" Shelley 

Wooster. O. ; Sophomore; Tackle; Weight 17t. 

The Immovable Stone Wall of the Line. 



iSsftA5=^ 









105 







Louie Fogg 

Kent, O. ; Junior; Guard: Weight \5l 

The Steady Playing Guard. 



"Jimmy" Hagerdon 

Cuyahoga Falls, O. ; Sophomore; End; Weight 165. 

The Fast Developing End. 



"Don" Housley 

Stow, O. ; Sophomore; End; Weight 135. 

Our Best Bet in the Passing Game. 



Larry Nicholson 

Cambridge, 0.; Sophomore; End; Weight 145. 

The Faithful, Fighting End. 




10(5 




"Joe" Carl 

Ra\enna, O. : Sophomore; End; \\eight 145. 

The Diminutive Fighter. 



"Chick" I Iickstead 

Cuyahoga Falls, 0.; Senior; End; Weight 163. 

The Steady De/eiise at Our End. 



Frank Fannelly 
.Akron, 0.; Senior; Guard; Weight 175. 
Another Block in the Path of Opponents.. 



"Mose" Hall 

Brookfield, O. ; Junior; End; Weight 160. 

Handicapped by an Old Injury. 









107 






"Ellie" Miller 

Stow, O. : Sophomore; Halfback; Weight 135. 

Kent's Fastest Backfield Man. 



"Johnnie" Menster 

Louisville, O. : Sophomore; Halfback: Weight 155. 

A Coming Threat. 



"Jay" WiLLiTTS 

Kent, O. ; Sophomore; Guard; Weight 145. 

A Coming Lineman. 



"Pathe" Scoutten 
Kent's First Official Motion Picture Cameraman. 




108 




An Enigma 



.Merle E. Wagoner has been coach of Kent State athletics for 
six years. He has brought our teams from something to be 
laughed at. up to a position where, todaw they are kno>\n and 
feared on every campus in the state. 

Kent State is no longer a normal school. We are a college, a 
full-fledged men's college. As such we deserve to be represented 
b\' first class teams. And we have those teams. 

But those teams cannot be forthcoming unless changes be 
made to suit the growth of the school. Wagoner needs a staff. 
He needs his full time available for his duties as coach. He neeiis 
untrammeled authorit\' in his (iekl. 1 le needs a\'ailable Iiolm's in 
the g.vm. lie needs LESS meddling on the part of certain facult\' 
and townspeople. 

He has needed all this for six }'ears. He has not gotten it. Will 
he ever oet itP The alumni of Kent State college is waiting to see. 




109 



oi 



"Trained for either laiiip or court, 
Skilled for every manly spoi 





110 



If 




1931-1932 Schedule 



December 


15- 


-Heidelberg, here. 




December 


19- 


-Muskingum, here 




January 


5- 


-Mt. Union, there. 




January 


7- 


-Akron, there. 




January 


13- 


-Hiram, here. 




January 


22- 


-Kenyon, there. 




January 


23- 


-Wooster, there. 




January 


29- 


-Mt. Union, here. 




February 


5- 


-Baldwin-Wallace, 


there 


February 


10- 


-Western Reserve, 


there 


February 


13- 


-Hiram, there. 




February 


16- 


-Baldwin-Wallace, 


here. 


February 


20- 


-Otterbein, here. 




February 


24- 


-Wooster, here. 




Februar}' 


27- 


-Kenyon, there. 





112 




Record 1930-31 



l\ent.. 
Kent.. 
Kent.. 
Kent.. 
Kent.. 
Kent. 
Kent.. 
Kent.. 
Kent. 
Kent.. 
Kent.. 
Kent.. 
Kent.. 
Kent.. 



..26— Case 18 

.31— Capitol 11 

.23— Mt. Lnion 37 

.35 — Muskingum 33 

..20— Marietta -10 

..22 — Wooster 3 5 

.26— Hiram 24 

.24— Heidelberg 30 

..35— Woob-ter 53 

.33 — Kenyon 23 

-19- Mt. Union 52 

..23— Ohio Northern 40 

..25— Akron 28 

.43— Marietta 34 



Kent 40— Ohio Northern 31 

Kent 42 — Ken)on 35 

Kent has had a strange year on the maple. The\' were up and 
then the\' were down. The\' trimmed Muskingum., Marietta, Hiram 
and Case. Those four teams represent the cream of the Ohio Confer- 
ence. Then the\' went into a slump and fell to Akron. Mt. Lnion and 
several others. The fault was not with Coach Wagoner. A man who 
is allowed the grand total of four and five hours of weekl\' practice and 
who can turn out a team such as Kent has. is a man to be retained and 
treasured. I le has ideals high enough to place Kent al the top but 
when his time is de\'oted to tasks in other (.lepartments his ideals have 
to suffer. Gi\'e Wagoner a fair chance ani.1 then let's sec his team per- 
form. E\en now he gives a .500 average. 





Gene Traxler 

Forward 

Sophomore Stow, Ohio 



Senior 



Senior 



Junior 



Gordon Kelso 
Forward 

Ravenna, Ohio 



Harland Sickman 
Guard 

Mayfield, Ohio 



Clyde Hall 
Center 

Brookfield, Ohio 



Walter Taylor 

Guard 

lunior Akron, Ohio 



114 




Junior 



Charles Hickstead 

For-uard 

Cinahoga Falls, Ohio 



John Menster 

Fomard 
Sophomore Louisville, Ohio 



Leonard Baker 
Guard 
Sophomore Grafton, Ohio ^' 



Larry Nicholson 

Foricard 

Sophomore Cambridge, Ohio 



Walter IIagerdon 

Guard 

Sophomore Cu\ahoga Fails. Ohio 






116 




117 




Baseball, 1930 

SEASON'S RECORD 

Western Reserve 9 — Kent State 8 

Oberlin 10— Kent State 

Ohio Northern 6 — Kent State 9 

Hiram 8— Kent State 9 

Mt. Union 1 1 — Kent State I 

Hiram 1 — Kent State 12 

Akron 13 — Kent State 3 

Baseball finds little support among students at Kent and conse- 
quently little can be expected of the squad which "Wag" turns out. 
Baseball as a college sport is a relic of antiquity. Despite the lack of 
interest "Wag" has produced some good teams in past years. 



118 




I < I" " ' I \ 



Wrestling 



Although it is Kent's >oungest \arsit_\' sport, wrestling is also one of 
its most popular. This is due to the calibre of the teams which we are 
putting out. 

Two state champions last \ear and three this \ear ga\e us national 
notice. Stejskal, Dunla\e\' and Alenough came thru this \ear. 

So far this season the team has downetl .Miami, Case and .Akron, 
the latter b\- a score of 40-0. The\- ha\e lost to Ohio U. ani.1 to Ohio 
State B. 

Coach Begala is to be complimented on his team and Chaplain ".\rt" 
Stejskal, the state Champ of last \ear, is to be confjratulaled upon the 
splentlid style in which he leads his men. 




119 



If 




Men*s Intramural Sports 

Intramural sports were first introduced at Kent last year when competition was 
held among the three fraternities and the independent men. The sports are under 
the direction of Professor George J. Altmann, of the physical education depart- 
ment. During each quarter of the school year various tournaments are held and 
the winners of each are awarded a certificate and points towards the year's trophy. 



Spring, 1930 

The contests held were in tennis, in which the Delta Phi Sigma men took first 
place and in Indoor Baseball in which the Kappa Mu Kappa took first place. 

At the recognition banquet the first year's trophy was awarded to and became 
the permanent possession of the Delta Phi Sigma Fraternity. New trophies will 
be offered each year and will be awarded to the team which has compiled the 
greatest number of points during the year. 



120 





Fall, 1930 



With the opening of the fall term came the opening of new competition and the 
following tourne_\s produced the following winners: 

Cross-Country Run — I ndependents 
X'olley Ball — Independents 
Horse Shoes — Delta Phi Sigma 

Winter, 1931 

The acti\'ities of the winter term included basketball, handball, a g\m meet anil 
a swimming meet. .At the time this book went to press the Kappa .Mu Kappa 
men had won first place in the basketball ^ames: Delta Phi Sigma had taken hand- 
ball ani.1 the sv.im meet, while the Independents took the gym meet. 

The purpose of intramural sports is to give to the mediocre pla\er an oppor- 
tunit\ to indulge in healths' endea\or and. to develop fellowship among the men 
of the college. \'arsit\- men are barreil from competition in the various sports and 
strict rules of eligibility are upheld. 




121 




122 




123 



r^f\ 




Women's Athletic Association 

The Kent branch of the National Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion was organized in May, 1928, for the purpose of furthering 
the national motto, "Play for Plaj's Sake". The association is 
now in its third year of activity at Kent. .Any woman student is 
eligible to membership after she has earned fifty points in sports 
sponsored by the W. A. A. 

All the members are divided into two teams, the Yanks and the 
Rebels. This furthers the competitive spirit. Sports in which 
the associations participate are as follows: soccer, basefootball, 
basketball, volleyball, baseball, horse shoes, bowling, paddle ten- 
nis, handball, clogging, archery, tennis, swimming and track meets, 

The groups sponsor several all-college functions. The high 
mark of each year is the annual Circus. The association deserves 
credit for the splendid way in which it is achieving its goal 
of "Play for Play's Sake". 



124 




Varsity K Club 



After a period of comparative inactivity the club was reorgan- 
ized this year and has been fairly active to date. The members 
are those who have won their varsity K in competition at Kent. 
The se\'eiai coaches are also members. One of the prime purposes 
of the club is to pre\'ent the wearing of other than college letters 
and to create fellowship among the athletes at the college. 

Officers of the club are as follows. President, Frank Mc- 
Caslin: Nice-Presidents. Arthur Stejskal and Ted Sapp: Treasurer. 
Walter Taxior, anel Secretar\', Harland Sickman. 




125 



ACTIVITIES 



\: 



^ 



k: 



x: 




-7- 



zr 



126 




128 




129 



Collese Social Committee 

The college social committee is made up of several facult>' members 
and one student member from each of the four classes and from each 
of the several representative groups on the campus. It is the policy of 
the social committee to legislate and provide for all social functions 
which are in any waj' connected with the college. It has been the policy 
in the past to require all organizations wishing to hold or to sponsor a 
social function to signify such at the proper place and to take the neces- 
sary steps toward receiving permission from the committee. 

During the past year several worthy changes have taken place. 
These have given greater liberty to the college students. This is a state 
school and as such should not be taunted v,ith the fears and scruples of 
a religious school. It is the policy of the social committee to overcome 
as fast as possible, the few remaining and antiquated scruples of some 
of the older members of the faculty. 



130 




Womcn*s League 

President ------- Helen MacCurdy 

Vice-President ----- Harriette Crawford 

Secretary --.... Margaret Porter 

Treasurer ------ Pauline Serrett 

The \\ omen's League is much like the Men's Union in that it auto- 
maticall\- includes all women in school. The league sponsors several 
social functions such as the Big and Little Sister T'eas, the New Year's 
Bali and the Sunset Dances. The women of the facult\- are included as 
honorar\- members. 





131 



Men*s Union 



CHAIRMEN 

Charles Dunn ------ Delta Phi Sigma 

DwiGHT Myers ----- Sigma Tau Gamma 

Louis Fogg ------ Kappa Mu Kappa 

Harry Rutter ------ Independents 

The Men's Union automatically includes in its membership all the 
men in the college, both on the faculty and in the student body. It 
sponsors annual events including the New Year's Ball and other all- 
college functions. The aim and the hope of the group is to advance 
good will and fellowship among the men of the college. 




132 




Kent State Council 



Membership in the Council is composed of one representati\e from 
each men's organization. The Pan-Hellenic Association, The Women's 
League, The OlT Campus Women, and the Dormitory Women. The 
Dean of Women and the Dean of i\len are the ad\isors of the group and 
work with the members in all matters. 

Many activities were sponsored b\- the Council during the year. \n 
assemble at which the Freshmen were received by the upper classes, 
was under their direction. This is a valuable custom and it is hoped 
that it will be preserved as an annual function. 

Class elections were under the direction of the Council, as was the 
Red Cross dri\'e for this \-ear. 

7 he Council meets once a month to discuss problems arising from 
student activities and to solve them in so far as it is in its power to do so. 

Kent State Council through acquisition of more power each year is 
becoming an important organization on the campus. Its progress is to 
be commended, for student go\'ernment is a sign of a growing institu- 
tion. 





133 




"And he answered. What's the use 
Of this bragging up aiul dowu?^ 




134 




135 




The Chestnut 
Burr StaFf 



The staff of the Chestnut Burr has endeavored to 
produce the best book in the history of the college. 
It is for the students to decide. The book was 
Eldon F. Scoutten, Ed.tor produced two months earlier than ever before and 

over 1000 copies were sold. This alone is something of which to be proud. The 
book is the product of the students of the college. Certain grievances there are 
because of the difference of opinion among the college faculty as to just how the 
book should be edited. Certain selfish individuals evidently wish to make the 
Burr a product of their departments. It is actually a product of the student body. 
The work throughout, wherever feasible, has been done by students. We have ac- 
cepted the bitterness dished up to us and bourne the slanders piled upon us with 
the sustaining philosophy that, after all, this is life. The outcome of it all is this 
book. We hope you will like it. 




136 




Staff Members 




James N. Holm 
Business Manager 



Editorial: 

Arthur Hommei. 
Phil Barry 
Joe Kelley 
Harriette Crawford 
Kathrine Faulk 
Harold Jones 
Robert Blythe 
Mary Donze 
Polly Sawyer 
iMaxine Henderson 
Mary Donze 



Business : 

Leo Lower 
Leonard Baker 
Russell Brooks 
Arthur Peebles 
John Wilson 
Joe Day 
Arlein Brown 
Don Housley 
Marion Hunter 
Robert Didham 






The Kent Stater 



One of the finest things about Kent State College 
is our weekly newspaper. Edited by Harold Jones 
and supervised by Buryl Engleman, it represents the 
Harold R. Jones, Editor highest type of collegiate journalism. 

It provides a weekly mirror to the events of the campus. With its non-par- 
tisan policy, its freedom from fraternity and sorority politics and its modern out- 
look, it is truly a paper of which to be proud. 

As a charter member of the Ohio Collegiate Newspaper Association, it sends 
two delegates every year to the annual meetings. 

Through the efforts of Jones, the meeting will be held at Kent next fall. A list 
of the staff members is to be found on the adjoining page. 




138 




I 



StaFF 




i:5iSiS?^ 



M 



BuRVL Engleman 
Faculty Adviser 

Joe Kellev -- Assistant Editor 

Art H0.M1MEL ---..- Assistant Editor 
George Barnetson ...-.-- News Editor 
Harriette Crawford ------ Society Editor 

AIarjorie Russell ------- jjie Dabbler 

Reporters: 

Arthur Peebles Marlon Fulmer Maxine Mcore 

Robert Blythe Harold Gear Riley Runk 

Charles Deauan Hildegarde Halama Polly Sawyer 

Evelyn Dick Ernest Keck Ingrid Smerling 

Mary Donze Kenneth Kirk Anna Tescher 

Phil Engle.man John McFarland Julia Van Court 

Kathryn Faulk Helen MacCurdy Margaret Van Winkle 

Charlotte Ferrari Glen Oyster 





"And in each pause the story made, 
Upon his violin, he played." 




140 




141 



Kent State Band 



The past year has been the most successful year in the history of 
the Kent State Band. The band, under the direction of Mr. Roy D. 
Metcalf made its first appearance in foreign fields at the Capitol foot- 
ball game. Its appearance there as well as at all home games was a 
step forward of which the college should be proud. To know that 
supporters are behind them away from home as well as at home, is a 
great inspiration to the college teams. 

Financial difllculties kept them from attending other games abroad. 
It is hoped that such trouble will not appear in coming years. 




142 




«s«s?> 



Orchestra 



The College Orchestra under the direction of Professor Roy D. 
Metcalf is one of the fine things at Kent. Offering a credit to those 
interested, it produces the appreciation of line music, and turns out a 
creditable production whenexer it performs. It has been used at several 
dramatic productions. 





143 



Glee Clubs 



When one stops to count the various things which the students of 
Kent State are doing, one immediately thinks of the glee clubs. These 
clubs are composed of anyone in the college who may wish to avail 
himself of the opportunity to indulge in food for the aesthetic senses 
and at the same time gain college credit. 

Both groups are under the direction of the jMusic Department and 
are supervised by Miss McCiafflin. 

The various concerts which they have produced and the various re- 
citals which they have given in chapel are proof enough of the fme 
work which they are doing. 

Officers for the year are ; 

President ------- George War.man 

Secretar y-T reasurer - - . - Arthur Peebles 
Librarian -------- Forest Hawk 



144 




Our New Theatre 



This spring mari<ed tiie opening and dedication of our new and re- 
modeled theatre and auditorium. The stage as it now stands is the 
largest college stage and the most completely equipped in the state of 
Ohio. There are onl\- two other stages in the colleges of the nation 
which are greater than ours. One is at "^'ale and the other is at the 
University of Michigan. 

The equipment which has been installed on and in our stage is of 
the finest. The equipment and the stage itself is an exact duplicate of 
the stage of the Playhouse in Cleveland. 

The senior class of Kent State College has been interested in such a 
development for the last four \ears. Now that we have it, even though 
that class can never enjoy it, that class is grateful to the administration 
and to the State of Ohio that thev ha\e given to our students, such an 
unusual opportunity as is represented in the new college theatre. 




145 




"Fresh woodbines climb and interlace. 
And keep the loosened stones in place.' 




146 




147 



If 



Mathematics Club 



The Mathematics Club was organized in January, 1931. Thp 
officers elected were: 

President - - Edna Trinter 

Secretary -------- Vida Kumse 

Professor R. E. Manchester 

Dr. H. E. Stelson 

MEMBERS: 



Faculty Advisors 



D. C. Abbott 
D. M. Brocklehurst 
J. E. Comer 
S. J. Fear 
Michael Herchek 
l. hostetler 
W. E. Kincaid 
Vida Kumse 
Lower Kellog 
Frank Kunst 
Eldred Miller 
Lucille McKierman 
Herald Moore 

Pauline 



Clarke Musser 
Carl Pfenniger 
Marcella Rush 
Regena Stamm 
Edward Stone 
Eleanor Stone 
Lucille Thomas 
Eugene Traxler 
Edna Trinter 
Chalmers Weaver 
Samuel Fiorenzo 
Adolph Schandel 
Virgil Cobb 
Pardee 



148 




H 



ome economics 



Club 



i:^i«:i<> 



The Practice House which was opened in 1930 as a laboratory for 
the Home Economics Majors, continues to be a center of interest to the 
members of the club. Curtains, rugs and other furnishings were pur- 
chased for the house with money earned. The Practice House also 
serves as a club house where many social gatherings are held. 

The activities of the club are varied. Open house was held during 
freshman week. Its residents have entertained many members of the 
facult\'. The club is attempting to earn enough money to send dele- 
gates to the annual meeting of the .American Home Economics Associa- 
tion at Detroit, this summer. 

The officers of the club are: 

President ------ Dorothy Sutherby 

Vice-President ----- Je.^nnette Wheeler 

Secretary ------- Rita Spafford 

Treasurer ----- Catherine Cummincis 




149 



The French Club 



The membership of the French Club is drawn from the students 
enrolled in the French classes of the college. The club has an active 
membership roll of over twenty. Various social and intellectual gath- 
erings are held periodically throughout the year. At each of these 
gatherings some member of the club presents a discussion on a certain 
phase of French life. All business and conversation of the club is 
carried on in the French language. 

The club is sponsored by and is under the direction of Miss Belle 
Rowlen, the instructor in French and the faculty advisor to the group. 
The official name of the club is "Le Cercle". 




150 




The OFf Campus Women's Club 

This organization is composed of women of tiie college who are 
living oflF the campus, and it is one of the oldest and most active 
groups in the college. Its purpose is to give the members the same 
opportunity for social life as is afforded to the remainder of the 
students who are affiliated with other organizations. The club room 
is located on the second floor of Merrill Hall and is a center of rest and 
recreation for all the members. 

The club's acti\'ities are varied and include some main things each 
quarter. The oiTicers are: 

President ------ Lucile Truscott 

Vice-President ------ Alice Hinds 

Secretary -------- Ruth Joy 

Treasurer ------- Lucille Ewell 



^/l 





151 



Alpha Psi Omega 



The Beta Psi cast of Alpha Psi Omega is the only national honor- 
ary fraternity on the campus. The fraternity which has over ninety 
active chapters, or casts as they are called, presents at least one play 
every year. The production of "Dust of the Road", under the direc- 
tion of Professor E. Turner Stump, was one of the high spots of the 
college _\'ear. 

The local cast is headed b>' James Holm while the National Direc- 
tor and founder is E. Turner Stump, of Kent. 

At present the fraternity boasts a membership of over one hundred 
persons, thirty of which are members of the active and pledge chapters. 




152 




Physical Education Club 

The Ph}sical Education Club of Kent State College was organized 
in the fall quarter of 1928. Membership is open to all majors and 
minors, and members of the Health and Ph\sical Education lacultx'. 

At the first business meeting the following officers were elected: 

President ------- Victor Moore 

Vice-President ----- Catherine Conroy 

Secretary-Treasurer ----- Luella King 

The advisors are: George Altmann and Miss Ruth Bass. 

The club sponsors two functions each term: one a social, the other 
a business meeting. The first social meeting of tiie jear 1930-1931 was 
a banquet at Hotel Franklin. Mr. Rowe, of the Cleveland schools, 
addressed the seventy members present. 

Plans for the winter and spring quarters include outdoor social 
meetings in addition to the business meetings. 



M 





153 






The Kindersarten-Primary Club 

This club, organized in 1929, is composed of students who are major- 
ing in Kindergarten-Primary work. The club is a branch of the 
national organization called the Association of Childhood Education. 
At present the club has an active roll of seventy-five members. It takes 
a large part in the charity and educational work of the college and of 
the city. 

The officers of the club are: 

President ------- Elizabeth Ludt 

Vice-President ----- Olive Bumphrey 

Treasurer ------ Margaret Carroll 

Corresponding Secretary - - - Lena Heidelberg 
Recording Secretary - - - - Lucille Truscott 

Faculty Advisor ------- Miss Swan 




154 




Independent Men*s Club 

The membership of this club is drawn indiscriminately from the 
men who have not become afTiliated with any fraternal order. The 
club members participate in intra-mural activities with the men from 
the three fraternities. The club has certain social functions periodi- 
cally and last year issued a challenge to the fraternities to meet them 
in euchre, chess, ping pong and other games. The membership is not 
binding and the members are at liberty to drop out at any time if a 
chance to join a fraternity should arise. 



President - - - - - ' - - Wilfred Slater 
Vice-President . . . . . Arthur Tumpach 
Secretary-Treasurer . - - - Walter Shammo 
Faculty Advisor ------ Mr. Harbourt 





155 



y. w. c. A. 



This group which is a branch of the national organization, initiated 
one hundred and twenty-seven members last fall at a very impressive 
service. Various picnics and social functions are sponsored each year. 
Charity plays a big part in the activities of the group, 

The regular meetings are conducted every week at 312 Merrill. 
The group sends certain delegates to the state convention each year. 

The officers of the club are: 

President - - - - - -.-- Ruth Lytle 

Secretary - - - - - - - Eleanor Stone 

Treasurer - - - - - Dorothy McClelland 

Faculty Advisor ------ Dean Verder 




156 




y. M. C. A. 



With a marked increase in membership, the Y. M. C. A. began its 
second jear as a student organization of the college in the fall of 1930. 
Regular weeklj- meetings were held in Merrill Hall on Wednesday even- 
ings. 

The following members were elected and installed in ofTice: 

President ------- Walter Shammo 

Vice-President ----- Franklin W'illl^ms 

Secretary ------- Clayton Alden 

Treasurer ------ Arthur Tumpach 

Council Representative - - - George McCague 
Publicity Chairman - - - - John McFarland 

Faculty Advisor - - - Professor Edward Pake 

The Y. .M. C^ A. has a physical, mental, social, and spiritual aspect 
to its functions. The physical side is evidenced in meetings in the 
g\'mnasium. The club has suppers, roasts, and parties for its mem- 
bers. In its live, up-to-date discussions, a medium for developing ideas 
and thoughts is furnished. Finally in every way, the members try to 
build up characters of strong moral and spiritual fibre. 

Every man who attends the college, is eligible to join the Kent State 
Y. M. C. A. 





157 




"The blows of my hammer 
Ring in the earthquake." 




158 




159 



If 




Men*s Debate 



All worthwhile institutions start with a small and not always suc- 
cessful beginning. 

Kent State entered intercollegiate debate circles in 1929 when three 
members of the present Senior class took part in a debate with Hiram 
College. This beginning was unsuccessful as far as immediate victory 
was concerned, but it was successful in that it created interest in the 
forensic art and showed possibilities of development. 

in 1929-1930 Kent State debate teams under the direction of Pro- 
fessor Pake, took part in four intercollegiate debates. 

This year, as a member of the Northern Ohio Debate League and 
under the coaching of Professor E. T. Stump, debating has progressed 
rapidly. Due to the fact that our team was the only team in the state 
able to defeat the Akron University team, which later won the State 
championship, it is hoped that we will be admitted to the Ohio Con- 
ference next season. 

The squad this year is composed of James Holm, Eldon Scoutten, 
Phi! Barry, Ralph McGinnis, Robert Blythe, and Thomas Carothers. 



160 





\i\ 



The Women's Debate Squad 

This year, under the direction of Professor E. Turner Stump, the 
college sponsored the first girls' debate team in its history. Answering 
the call earlv in the year, the members prepared speeches and argu- 
ments on the subject of State Alethcine. Debates were held with .Akron 
l.'niversity. Hiram and .Mt. L'nion. .All were no-decision contests. 

The squad is as follows: Susan Bare, Louise Hamilton, 1-ois Scott. 
Anne Conrai.1, and the coach, Professor Stump. 




161 




Oratory 



This year was the first that Kent State College ever sent a represen- 
tative to the state contest in oratory. Early in March several students 
tried out for the privilege of representing the school and Eldon Scoutten 
was selected to compete at Alliance. The subject of the oration was 
"Peace". 

Those competing for the local championship Vvere: James Holm, 
Ralph McGinnis, Phil Barry and Eldon Scoutten. 



162 




Chi Pi 



The Chi F^i fraternity of Kent State College is an honorary one 
maile up of members elected b\' the acti\e chapter, after such members 
ha\e done meritorious work in the field of journalism and its se\eral 
phases. The group is di\ided into four divisions; the printer's devils, 
the cub reporters, the star reporters and the editors. The members are 
awarded the \arious degrees as their work merits. The present chapter 
is composed of the Editor of the Kent Stater, Harold Jones: the Editor 
of the Chestnut Burr, Eldon Scoutten; the Business Manager of the 
Chestnut Burr. James Molm, and the oldest reporter from a standpoint 
of service on the paper, Arthur Peebles. 

The group once boasted a membership of thirtw Professor Pack- 
ard is the facult\- ad\isor and Professor Buryl Engleman is an honor- 
ar\' member. 




Kii 



CCGANIZATI€N$ 



^ 



x: 





Z7 



~y 



v^ 



164 




166 




1(1/ 




Delta Phi Sisma 

Founded at Kent, Ohio. March 9, 1024 

OFFICERS 

President ------- Eldon Scouiten 

Vice-President ------- James Holm 

Secretary ------- Robert Didham 

Treasurer ------ - Edwin Hirt 

Historian ------- Arthur Peebles 

Sargeant at Arms - - - - Arthur Ste.iskal 

Chaplain ------- Merle Leggitt 



Eldon Scoutten 
James Holm 
Robert Didham 
Edwin Hirt 
Arthur Peebles 
Arthur Stejskal 
Merle Leggitt 
George Warman 
Phil Barry 
Leo Lower 
Charles Dunn 



ACTIVES 

L ester Sabin 
Harold Jones 
Donald FIousley 
Don Straub 
William Langell 
John Wilson 
CoRviN Gerig 
FIervey Stahl 
Harold Gear 
Earl Wright 
Orin Smucker 
FIenry Willett 



Arthur Hommel 
Eugene Traxler 
Eldred Miller 
Forest Hawk 
William Broz 
James Shelley 
L eslie Chapman 
A4yron Warnes 
Larry Nicholson 
Lowell Kilbourne 
William Edmiston 



Carl Meeker 
Richard Kinney 
Burton Bell 
James Eaton 

Faculty Advisor 



PLEDGES 

Kenneth Hissner 
Elmer Dunlavy 
Gerald Leonard 



Dr. A. 

Honorary Members: E. 



L. FIeer. 

Turner Stump, 



168 



Harold Law 
Kenneth Kirk 
Riley Runk 
Karl Falls 



D. W. Pearce. 






169 



If 



Kappa Mu Kappa 

Founded 1922 

OFFICERS 

President ------- Gordon Kelso 

Vice-President ------- Ted Sapp 

Treasurer ------ Harland Sickman 

Recording Secretary ------ Joe Kelly 

Corresponding Secretary ----- Clyde Hall 

Scribe -------- Ward Secrist 

Master of Works . - - - James Menough 

Prelate --------- Louis Fogg 

Sargeant at Arms ------ Harley Seiss 

{Elmer Pettay 
Ted Sapp 
Kermit Taylor 

Kappa Mu Kappa is the oldest fraternity at Kent, The members 
of the group are found in all functions of the school, particularly 
athletics. 

ACTIVES 



Edward Spinneweber 
James Menough 
Frank McCaslin 
Gordon Kelso 
Ted Sapp 
Edward Harris 
Everett Johnson 
Elmer Pettay 
Charles Kilbourne 
Harley Seiss 
Clyde Hall 
Louis Fogg 
Harland Sickman 



GoMER Lewis 
William Lane 
Warner Cunningham 
Ward Secrist 
Elwood Murphy 
John Menster 
William Disbro 
D. C. Abbott 
Donald Robinson 
Joseph Kelley 
Roy Gilmore 
Kermit Taylor 
Walter Hagerdon 



Paul Brand 
Charles Scott 
Frank Fannelly 
Alva Sapp 
D. E. White 
Kenneth Weichel 
Leonard Lawrence 
Philip Capozzi 
Luther Gardener 
Clarence Cummings 
Thomas Jenkins 
Charles Hickstead 
D. i4usTiN Grubb 



PLEDGES 



Robert Chorpening 
Ted Evans 



Matthew Flowers 
William Heber 
Richard Mansfield 



Al Losito 
Clive Lukens 



Faculty Advisor: T. E. Davey 

Patrons: Dr. A. S. Roberts, S. A. Harbourt, Dick Donaghy 



170 




«s»ii5^ 





171 



Sigma Tau Gamma 

Installed at Kent 1927 

OFFICERS 

President - - - - - - - Merle Baker 

Vice-President ------ Anthony Ross 

Treasurer ------- Leonard Baker 

Recording Secretary ------ Watt Bair 

Corresponding Secretary - - - - Delbert Cline 

Historian ------- Willlam Spraglie 

Sergeant at Arms ----- David Baughman 

Faculty Advisor - - - - - - E. C. Stopher 

Business Manager ----- Dwight Myers 



Watt Bair 
Glade Bowman 
George McCague 
Dwight Brocklehurst 
Fred Drew 
William Sprague 
Marion FIunter 
David Baughman 
Lawrence Philips 
Lawrence Gatchel 
A4er'R1ll Mills 
Leonard Baker 
Merle Baker 



ACTIVES 

Delbert Cline 
Donald Climes 
Philip Engleman 
LiNwooD Freeman 
Michael Maro 
Anthony Ross 
Price Chamberlain 
Fred Swartz 
Russell Brooks 
Robert Blythe 
Thomas Crothers 
Joe Day 
Charles Demian 



Seymour Fear 
George Fudge 
Nelson Gauger 
Dean Gintert 
Jerry Johnson 
Gene McAbee 
Robert Mullett 
Robert Mills 
William Martin 
Beull Stringer 
Harold Schamp 
Alton Schopfer 
Leon Hodgkins 



HONORARY MEMBERS 
Dr. a. W. Stewart Dr. A. O. DeWeese 



B. F. Engleman 



172 






173 




"Queen Stgrid the hlmghty 
Sal proud and alojt^ 




174 




175 



w 



Sigma Sigma Sigma 

Installed at Kent 1925 

OFFICERS 

President ------- Marian Palmer 

Vice-President ------ Marion Mouat 

Recording Secretary ----- Dorothy Ott 

Corresponding Secretary - - - Cornelia Stewart 
Treasurer ------ Adelaide Walker 

Advisor ------- Mona Fletcher 

Sentinel ------- Helen Willits 

ACTIVES 

Marian Palmer Agnes Albright Mary Beckwiiii 

Marion Mouat Maxine Henderson Edith Petre 

Cornelia Stewart Helen MacCurdy Ruth Lytle 

Dorothy Ott Olive Bumpiirey Helen Thorpe 

Adelaide Walker Lucille Truscott Evelyn Davis 

Helen Willits Marian Fulmer Emily Farnum 

Freda Lang 

PLEDGES 

Mary Irvin Mildred Thomas Virginia Lytle 

Dorothy Guy Ruth Caughey Eleanor Yocum 

Susie Palfi Pauline Terret 

PATRONS AND PATRONESSES 

Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Stopher Dr. and Mrs. A. Sellew Roberts 

Mr. and Mrs. G. Frank Elgin 




176 




Delta Sisma Epsilon 

Installed at Kent 1926 

OFFICERS 

President ------- .Margaret Flets 

I'ice-Presidi'iit ------ Margaret Melin 

Treasurer ------ Martha Johnson 

Recording Secretary ----- Rlth Swaney 

Corresponding Secretary - - - - Alice Laird 

Chaplain ----- IIildegarde FIalama 

Advisor ------ Qra Belle Bach.man 



i^Afc?!/ 



.Mnrgaret Fleps 
.M\RGARET Melin 
Martha Johnson 
Ruth Swaney 

Edyth Anerv 
E\A Johnson 
Rlth Kopp 
M \R'>' Glillet 



ACTI\ES 

Arlein Brown 
Alice Laird 
Ruth Reichard 

PLEDGES 

Claldia Clenenger 

.\L\RJORIE RlSSELL 

LuELLA King 



Doddaleen Lehman 
Olga Blrick 
Ora Belle Bachhan 
Hildegarde FIalaaia 

FIelen Dunston 
Pauline Cubbison 
\'iRGiNiA Dance 
Helen Hoffman 





177 



^^3=, 



Alpha Sigma Alpha 

Founded at Miami LJniversity 1914 
Omicron Omicron Chapter. Kent, 1926 

OFFICERS 

President ------- Jeanette Riddle 

Vice-President ----- Gertrude Kennedy 

Secretary ------- Mary Donze 

Treasurer ------- Polly Sawyer 

Faculty, Advisor ------ Ada V. Hyatt 

ACTIVES 

Helene Beitz Mary Donze Jeannette Riddle 

Geneva Brand Gertrude Kennedy Polly Sawyer 

Edna King 

PLEDGES 

Betty Anderson Mildred Hall Ardis Reichard 

Florence Bodman Bonnie Hart Beatrice Shute 

Katherine Faulk Janet Jones Helen Sloan 

Louise Grove Louise Kist Mary Stoner 

Laurel Hanley Mary Jane Matelsky Zeta Welsher 

Betty Moore 

FACULTY MEMBERS 
Miss Ada V. FIyatt Miss Florence Sublette Miss Helen A4cClaflin 

PATRONS AND PATRONESSES 
Mr. and Mrs. Steve FIarbourt Mr. and Mrs. Merle Wagoner 




178 




Theta Sisma Upsilon 

Installed at Kent 1026 

OFFICERS 

President ------- Helen Kropf 

Vice-President ----- Katherine \'olos:n 

Secretary ------- Hazel Young 

Treasurer -------- Cleo Crow 

Editor -------- Martha Durbin 

Faculty Advisor - - - Mary Kathryn Boswell 

ACTIVES 

Evelyn Harrold Katherine Volosin Leatha Bullock 

Doris Shanahan Dorothy Mackey Alice Chacey 

Hazel Young Helen Knox Martha Durbin 

Helen Kropf Cleo Crow Mildred Moulton 

Dorothy Quinlan Marian Friend 

PLEDGES 

Helen Halloway Margaret Ackerman Hazel Jones 

Adelaine Heller Margaret Van Winkle Elinor Disbro 

PATRONS AND PATRONESSES 
Mr. and Mrs. Eric Griebi.ing .Mr. and .Mrs. Dwight Steere 



^^iO 





179 



^=: 



Pi Delta Thcta 

Installed at Kent 1928 

OFFICERS 

President ------ Margaret Carroll 

Vice-President ------ Luella Conzett 

Second Vice-President - - - Louise Hamilton 
Secretary ------ Kathleen O'Neill 

Treasurer ------- Miriam Starkey 

Faculty Advisor ------- Ruth Bass 

ACTIVES 

Margaret Carroll Cathleen O'Neill Louise Hamilton 

Luella Conzett Miriam Starkey Dorothy Sutherby 

PLEDGES 
Alice Borex Adelaine Wilcox 

PATRONS AND PATRONESSES 

Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Johnson Dr. and Mrs. J. B. Turner 

Miss Elfelda Littlejohn 




180 




Alpha Sisma Tau 

Founded at ^'psilanti. Michigan, in 1898 
Eta Chapter Founded at Kent State College in 1927 

OFFICERS 

President ------- Maxine Moore 

Vice-President - - - - Elizabeth \VlLLL^iMS 

Corresponding Secretary . . _ Mildred Pyle 

Recording Secretary ----- Edna Eaton 

Treasurer ----- Martha Baumberger 

Faculty Advisor ----- Miss Laura Hill 

ACTIVES 

Martha Baumberger Blanche Millman Clara Raby 

Mildred P'ile Katherine Schaab Helen Bunn 

RoMayne McGrath Catherine Conroy Edythe Oliver 

Katherine Smith Elizabeth Williams Margaret Roberts 

Maxine Moore Edna Eaton Marguerite Oyler 

PLEDGES 

Mildred Call Ruth Wager Helen McCandless 

Mary Jane Manchester Betty Noel Harriet Crawford 

Elizabeth Rufener Catherine Kenney Ruth Pekarek 

Katherine Myers Eunice Hines Lois Hanna 

Dam a McVey 

PATRONS AND PATRONESSES 
Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Manchester .Mr. \nd .Mrs. Dick Donaghy 



^X:^^^::^ 





181 



Pi Kappa Sigma 

President ------- Elizabeth Lewis 

Vice-President ----- Virginia Johnstone 

Correspondnig Secretary - - - Margaret Porter 
Recording Secretary - - - - Eleanor Mansfield 

Treasurer ------ Harriet Patterson 

Faculty Advisor - - - Miss Amanda Thrasher 

ACTIVES 

N'iRGiNiA Johnstone Eleanor Mansfield Harriet Wilson 

Elizabeth Ludt Margaret Porter Amanda Thrasher 

Harriet Patterson 

PLEDGES 

Shirley Goodwin Grace Nagle Marion Sass 

Ruth Barnhart Lucille Galloway Genevieve McNeal 

Virginia Mansfield Winifred Ehrick Marguerite Doerschug 

Virginia Stone 

PATRONS AND PATRONESSES 
Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Clark Mr. and Mrs. T. E. Davey 




182 




Pi Kappa Sisma 



Pi Kappa Sigma was founded at Ypsilanti. Miciiigan in 1804. It 
is the oldest and largest national educational sororit\'. It has tv>enty- 
nine active chapters. Psi Chapter was founded at Kent in 1926. 

During the \ear the sorority does charity work of various sorts. 
An outstanding event of the year was the visit of iMrs. Renz, the second 
national \ ice-President. During the last summer the sororitx' rented a 
cottage on one of the lake resorts and several members spent the sum- 
mer there. 



Sh^ 





I8i 



Phi Alpha Alpha 

Founded at Kent State College, May, 1930 



OFFICERS 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Editor 



Faculty Advisor 



Seniors: 

Marjory Brigstock 
Velma Rood 
Eleanor Stone 



Freshmen: 

Dorothy Espenchied 
Faith Spellman 
Josephine Taft 



Eleanor Stone 

Marjorie Deisman 

Elsie Crewson 

Clara Seymour 

- Marjorie Brigstock 

Doris Bob Kinneman 



ACTIVE 
Sophomores: 

Albert Clark 
Elsie Crewson 
Marjorie Deisman 

PLEDGES 
Sophomores: 

Ruth Apley 
Ethel Etling 
Velma de Ford 
Ruth Watkins 



Helen Derr 
Anna Hunyady 
Mardella Near 
Clara Seymour 

Juniors: 

LUCILE EwELL 

Alice Hinds 

Seniors: 

Frances Tyler 
Catherine Walker 



PATRONS AND PATRONESSES 
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Musseliman Dr. and Mrs. A. W. Stewart 




184 





185 



Backword 



The Editors of this book wish to present it with the sincere belief 
that it. in some measure, mirrors the activities of the college. The 
various organizations will doubtless find much to criticise. The vari- 
ous departments will find much upon which to base unfavorable agita- 
tion. No group will feel that it has been given due consideration and 
respect. But all this is of little import. 

The book was planned to apportion the pages as they deserve ap- 
portionment: not with the view of favoring one group or one class, but 
with the idea of presenting the campus life in its true proportions. 

The editors hope that in future years, the various factions of the 
college v\ill withhold selfish motives and strive to assist in the pro- 
duction of a truh' good book. 



f EATLCES 



^ 



"x: 




:7 



'y 



-y 



186 





AXINt MOORE- 



188 






189 




190 



\ 




H 


\ 


Huv -^ — * V 


A^^9 


\_ 




1 





HLtANORSrONt 

d BfcST STUDENT 




191 




192 




iSS!«S5^ 





193 





CO^-ltlDX 





194 




WINTER 

Hits The 

CAMPUS 







195 




196 





GANIPIUS 
CIW^^IPAGTIEIPS 




^/l 




197 




198 






199 



College Calendar 



SEPTEMBER 

26th — Freshman register and take entrance tests. 

27th — Formal registration for freshman. Dean Verder lectures 

freshman women. 
28th — Vesper service under Dr. Engleman and Mr. Rumold. 
29th — Upper classmen register. 
30th — All classes meet. Football team guests of Kent Rotary at 

luncheon. 

OCTOBER 

1st — Y. W. C. A. holds picnic for freshman women. First issue 
of Kent Stater. 

3rd — Reception and dance for student body in gym. Mt. Union 
defeats Kent at Alliance, 18-6. 

6th — W. A. A. meeting in the gym — Moulton hall election. 

7th — Pledges begin to assume the angle. 

6th — Reception and dance for student body in gym. Mt. Union 
defeats Kent 

8th— Big and Little Sister tea at Moulton. Y. W. C. A. meets. 

9th — Pep meeting and snake dance. Coach Wagoner speaks. 
10th — Faculty Club meets at Moulton. 
11th — Akron defeats Kent at Akron 12-6. 
13th — Men's Faculty Club meets at Franklin Hotel. 
14th — W. A. A. meets. Dean Verner lectures women participating 

in outside work. 
16th — Freshman Flouse Mothers party at Moulton. 
18th — Open house at Moulton. Kent loses to Case at Cleveland 6-0. 
20th — College Social Committee meets. 
21st — Social Dancing begins with a bang. 
22nd — First Assembly. Women's league meets. 
23rd — Sororities now rushing the babes. 
25th — Ashland ties Kent here 0-0. 
27th — Kent State Council meets. 
28th — Assembly. Governor Cooper speaks. Debate team meets. 

Burr staff meets. 
29th — Dean Verder starts series of freshman talks. Moulton Hall 

party. Intramurals start. 
30th — Fraternity men not on speaking terms. 
31st — NEOTA in Cleveland. Hot dawg! No skool. 
So endeth the first lesson. 



200 



Drugs Candy 



"Everything You Expect" 

In a 
MODERN 

DRUG STORE 

at 

HALE B. THOMPSON'S 

REGISTERED PHARMACIST 

Corner Main and Water Streets 

Telephones 150—151 



Magazines Stationery i 

J 

When patronising Advertisers it will pay you to mention The Chestnut Burr 

201 



NOVEMBER 

1st — Kent beats Hiram 6-0. Team hauls Gamma farmers away. 
2nd — Somebody died. 
3rd — Band practice. 

4th — Miss Sublette in hospital tor ear treatment. 
5th — Pan-Hellenic meets. Girls bowl. 
6th — Kent Stater out. Two men hurt in rush. 
7th — Football laddies leave on fatal trip to Columbus. 
8th— Kent 26, Capitol 0. Hot Hooves! 
10th — Trustees meet. 
11th — Class elections. Dirty work begins. No afternoon classes. 

Armistice day. Thank God for that. 
12th — 'Nother Stater edition. 
13th — Nothing doing. 

Doctor Stewart goes swimming with Dean Manchester. 
14th — Pep meeting, 
l^th — Kent 14, Defiance 7. Home-coming game. 

Kent Stater issues extra. 
17th — Faculty Club meets. 
18th — Debate squad meets. Strong wind. 
19th — Lowry Hall party. 
20th — Faculty women hold supper party. 
21st — All-College dance in gym. No liquor! 
22nd — Alpha Psi Omega luncheon in Cleveland. 
24th — Debate team defeats Akron University. 
26th — Assembly. 
29th — Dance orgy at Moulton. 

When repairing old oil lamps always save the old wicks. 
They make excellent pipe cleaners or shoe laces. Adver- 
tisement. 

DECEMBER 

1st — All back from Thanksgiving recess. Wagoner and Begala 
lament the loss of turkeys. 

2nd — Class elections. More dirt. Assembly. 

3rd — Somebody born. 

4th — Somebody died. 

5th — Somebody happy. 

6th — Somebody sad. (Pledges) 
10th— Y. W. C. A. bazaar. Big bizz. 
i ith — Register for winter term. 

12th — All Greek letter dance by well known sorority. 
13th — Faculty club party. Old folks make merry. 
15th — No soap. 



202 




Gruen Prestige Costs No More 

The Name on the Watch Dial 

is All Important 

GRUEN 

Official College Jeweler 

G. F. Elgin 

Jeweler and Optometrist 

141 N. WATER STREET 



Service 

Courtesy 



Efficiency 
Quality 



S. C. Bissler & Son 

SPECIAL FURNISHINGS 
FOR FRATERNITY AND 
SORORITY HOMES, IN- 
CLUDING 

Double Deck Beds 
Lounge Suites 
Dining Tables 
Rugs, Carpets 
Lamps and 
Study Desks 

Complete Home Furnishers 
Funeral Directors 

Corner Main and River Streets 
Telephone 530 
KENT, OHIO 



-r 



Compliments of 

Kent's Leading 
SHOE STORE 

Brownki!^ Shoes 

FOR MEN ... FOR WOMEN 



HOSIERY 



RUBBERS 



Greene-Kertscher 
and Mitchell 

'We Fit Your Feet and Feature 
Fit" 



106 E. Main St. 



KENT, O. 



WALK-OVER 
SHOES 



For Men 



For Women 



INMJETTICK 




For Women 

Featuring 

FIT STYLE COMFORT 

Greene & Kertscher 

Opp. Court House RAVENNA, O. 



When patronising Advertisers it will pay you to mentioti The Chestnut Burr 

203 



16th — -"Dust of the Road" by Alpha Psi Omega. 

17th — Harold Jones buys shroud for his car. 

18th — Kent wallops Case in ye basket balle game. 

19th — No more teachers, no more books, no more actives, angry 

looks. 
20th — Kent takes the wind out of Capitol's sails. 

Twas the night before Christmas and all the boys made 

merry. Poor Mary. 

Santa leaves Buryl Engleman a new hat. 

JANUARY 

1st — New year gets off to hot start. 

2nd — Kent beats Youngstown. 

3rd — Skool again. Miss Crane at Moulton. 

6th — Mose Hall gets first fan mail.* 

7th — Apparatus club meets. Mr. Altmann wins by fall. 

8th— Kent takes Muskingum 35-33. 

9th— All-College dance.* 
10th — Kent plays at Wooster.* 
11th — Freshman basketball starts. 
12th — Dean Verder still lecturing. 
13th — First birthday party at Lowry. 

Intra-Fraternity handball begins. 
14th — Faculty meeting. Kent downs Hiram in hard court tilt. 
15th — Freshmen still being lectured. Faculty Viomen eat. 
17th — Basketball, Heidelberg at Tiffin. Delta Sigs hold open 

house. 
21st — Wooster trims Kent. A sad tale. 
24th — Pi Kappa Sigma formal dance. Wrestling Manager Hawk 

announces he won't buy any more cigarettes. 
28th — Alpha Sigma Alpha Inter-Sorority tea. 
_29th — Commerce Club meets . 
31st— K-P Club meets. 

FEBRUARY 

2nd — Prexy approves College Theatre. 

5th — Ohio Northern plays here. Kent gets taken again. 

6th — -Theta Sigma Upsilon annual valentine dance. 

7th — Kent grunt men lose to Ohio State. 

8th — College Social Committee meets. 

9th — Lester Sabin misses a date. 



* Kent gets beat by some team. 



204 



The cover foi 
this annual 
was created by 

The DAVID I 

MOLLOY CO. 

2857 N. Western, Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 



(pvery M-olloy Made 

Cover hears this 

trade mark on the 

back lid' 



This Annual was 
Produced by 



The Ziegler Printing Co., Inc. 

BUTLER, PENNSYLVANIA 



i^^^4^*=?^^ 



Leading School Annual Printers 
for Twenty Years 



KT^Si^^iir:^ 



Specialists in Good Printing and Binding 

When patronising Advertiiers it ■will pay you to mention The Chestnut Burr 

205 



10th — Tri Sigs rushing again. 

1 1th — Faculty club meets. 

15th — No soap. 

18th — New regulation size wrestling mat arrives. 

21st — Kent scores double victory. Wrestlers down Miami, bas- 

kethballers wrestle and throw Marietta. 
23rd — Celebrate Washington's birthday by sleeping in. 
25Lh — Kent gets revenge. Kent 40, Ohio Northern 31. 
27th — Portage County tournament at Kent court. 
28th — Kent plays Kenyon again. Soft, 
29th — Wasn't no such date. Kan't fool us. 

MARCH 

1st — Phi Alpha Alpha pledges ride the goat. 

2nd — Debate, Kent vs. Baldwin-Wallace. 

4th — Intra-Mural gym meet. 

6th — Sectional basketball tournament at Kent. Gate crashing 

becomes a fine art. 
10th — Delta Phi Sigma celebrates seventh birthday. 
12th — Delts take Intra-Mural swimming meet. Everything all 

wet. 
13th — .Alpha Sigma Tau initiate. 
14th — All-Greek dance at Moulton. 
20th — 'Nother quarter gone. 
28th — Kent State Council courtesy dance. Postponed. 

APRIL 
1st — Fooled again! 
2nd — Debate. Kent vs. University of N'ermont. Kent wins. 

? — Junior-Senior Prom. 
25th — Sigma Tau Gamma dinner-dance. 
30th — Staters looking for Chestnut Burr staff. 

MAY 

2nd — Delta Phi Sigma Dinner Dance. 

15th — Spring Home-coming. 

16th — Baseball, Baldwin-Wallace at Kent. 

30th — Memorial Day. Staters still looking for the Burr staff. 

31st — Baccalaureate. 

JUNE 
4th — Class Day. 
5th — Commencement. 
6th — Another Chestnut Burr starts. 
7th — 1931 Burr staff found in Venezuela. 



206 



SPORTING GOODS 




O'SHEA 

HONOR AND CLASS 
SWEATERS 



SPECIAL PRICES 
To Teams, Class, Clubs, Fra- 
ternities and Sororities 




Trade In Your 
Old Golf Clubs 




The Central Hardware & Factory 
Supply Co. 

200 South Main Street 
Phone BL3138 AKRON, OHIO 



When patromitnii AJvcrlisers it mil pay you to mention The Chestnut Burr 

207 



Mud and Humor 



Famous Campus Celebrities 

Few Minutes Fanelly. 
Strangler Warman. 
Blotter Jones. 
Daniel Webster Olsen. 
Beta Sigma McCaslin. 
Lightnin' Joe Day. 
General Musser. 
Canary Slater. 
Valentino M. Baker. 



Kent Kampus 

The classroom slowly fills with the 
reluctant student body. The room is 
warm and sultry. Suddenly the pro- 
fessor appears at the front of the room 
and begins to speak. His words flow 
along in an even and pleasing tone. 
Then suddenly, ". . . . PENEPLAN- 
ED .... and the glaciers cut OFF 

some of ... . High POINTS 

I hope I'm not BORING you. . . ." 
And so on until the class is suddenly 
awakened by the bell. 



Seniors 

Experts have estimated that if all 
the ballot box stuffers in the world 
were allowed to vote in one election 
and that if all the crooked election 
judges in the world were allowed to 
judge the results of that election, that 
in all probability the election would 
be crooked. Certain activities and 
events which occurred last fall would 
put to shame all the comparatively 
amateur crooks in the world. Here's 
how it happened: The senior class 
held their election. 56 votes were cast. 
A checkup at the registrar's ofTice show- 
ed but 48 seniors. A counter check at 



the next election showed two sopho- 
mores, four juniors and two high 
school students, masquerading as sen- 
iors. One had got himself elected to an 
office. Two others were voting in all 
four classes on the campus. The rest 
were just plain amateur crooks. 



Words of Wisdom from Minds of 
Kent State Intelligentia 

Mr. Packard: "We need five bas- 
ketball players." 

Mr. Wagoner: "We need better 
English professors." 

Mr. Olsen: "I hope I'm not boring 
you." 

Miss Nixson: "You'll have to do it 
this way ..." 

Dean Verder: "Now, girls, remem- 
ber your manners." 

Mr. Stopher: "There are no vacant 
positions." 

Mr. Stump: 



Mr. Altmann 
those shoes." 



'Oh ta-da-de-da-da." 
"Off the floor with 



John Burger: "Now I've got to 
look like a smart man." 



Barber: "Shall I cut your hair 
close?" 

Mary Donze: "No, stand off as far 
as possible." 



Ambition 

Pete Sapp is going to open an ice 
factory in Alaska and Mose Hall is 
going to be his bookkeeper. 



208 



Is It Refreshments?! 



Just remember — we are famous 
at Kent State College for our 
Ice Cream, Ices and Fruit 
Punch. Let us supply your next 
"Shindig". 



The Perfection Dairy 
Company 

"Milk as it Should Be" 

NORTH RIVER STREET 

Phone 341 



The Home-coming ! 

Queen | 

Chose Oldsmobile! | 

Striking Appearance, Rugged | 

Durability, and Flashing Per- | 

formance combine to make Olds- [ 

mobile the Outstanding Value J 

in its class. Phone for a Dem- ! 

I 



onstration, Kent 700. 



I 



Bradley Motor Co. j 



118 S. DePeyster Street 



KENT, OHIO 



Sales 



Service 



I "\AVEY men carry away from Kent each year many 
-'— ' memories of good fellowship extended them by Kent 
State College students, faculty, and administration. 

T T is our hope that through your contacts with them and 
-'- your residence in Kent, the home of the Davey Institute 
of Tree Surgery, you have gained a greater appreciation of 
the beauty of trees, and the importance of the Tree Sur- 
geon's work. 

AS an educational institution concerned with the dis- 
semination of knowledge which will make for the 
extension of such an appreciation among the American 
people, we invite you as teachers to make use of the findings 
of our research department in teaching your students of the 
enemies of trees and their control, and related subjects. 

THE DAVEY TREE EXPERT CO., Inc. 

KENT, OHIO 



When patronising AJvcrlisers it 'uill pay you to tncntion The Chaliiiil liurr 



2X39 



Kent's Own Believe It or Not 



Don Straub won the 118 lb. wrest- 
ling championship of the school with- 
out wrestline one bout. 



Dr. James O. Engleman is not presi- 
dent of Kent State Colleae. 



No person has ever graduated from 
this college. 



The Kent Stater, which was estab- 
lished in 1927, carries "volume V", 
which means that it has been publish- 
ed five years. 



During the World War there were 
only 18 men enrolled at Kent and dur- 
ing the Civil War there were none. 



There are fifteen fraternities at Kent 
State College. 



The faculty of the college includes 
but seventeen professors. 



Representatives from five groups 
competed in the intramural wrestling 
meet, last spring. 



The Delta Phi Sigma fraternity won 
the yearly trophy in intramural sports 
last year, although they did not win as 
many events as the Kappa Mu Kappa 
boys. 



There never was any Kent State 
Normal School. 



It is possible to walk from any 
building on the campus, to any other 
building, without going outside. 



Mr. Johnson was once Dean of Men 
of this school. 



At one time during 1930 there were 
more men enrolled at this school than 



women. 



Kent State College had no fullback 
during all of last fall's football games. 



Jim Shelly won his first inter-col- 
legiate wrestling match before he was 
a member of the Kent team. 



The yearly snowfall is greater at 
Kent than anywhere in Greenland. 



The Kent State campus is warmer at 
all times of the year, than the south- 
ernmost part of Africa. 



George Washington never attended 
this school. 



Art Stesjkal has never been thrown 
in a wrestling match. 



210 



KENT NATIONAL 
BANK 

"The Bank of Courtesy to 
College Students" 



$ 

Checking Accounts Solicited 

4% Paid on Savings 

Safety Deposit Boxes For Rent 

$ 
4 Percent and Safety 



HELL WEEK 

"M\' stomach is empty, m\- belly is 
flat. . . . Most high and benevolent 

kind sir. . . . Yes sir Lydia 

Pinkham was once ver_\' popular. . . . 
The judge will please be seated. . . . 
Get those *##%(«'— off their feet. . . . 

Oh say, judge Case dismissed 

.... Shall I wax this too. ... My 
name is Gooperfeathers. . . . David 
was a shepherd lad. the pluck\' little 
cuss. ... To repair old mouse traps 
alwa}s use caution. . . . Wipe that 
smile off. . . . L^se the handles onls' 
tonight. . . . Who the hell dealt this 
mess. . . . — To that Cabin in the 
hill-s-s-s-s-s-s-s. . . . Can that yappin' 
.... All right, for gosh sakes get go- 
ing there scum!" 



Do You Heed the Golden Rule? | 

I 

THE merchants who have purchased advertising space | 

in THE CHESTNUT BURR are the business men j 

of Kent who are really interested in Kent State I 

College. Their establishments offer the utmost in con- j 

venience, value, and service to Kent State students. Inas- I 

much as they are interested in us, and we need and buy ! 

what they have to offer, it would seem only right and fair | 

that we should at least visit them occasionally. THE BURR i 
staff urges you to patronize its advertisers. The dividends 
will return to YOU. 



I17,if); ptilrdiii^iiifi AihetlistTi it u.;// pay yoii In xifiitioii Thi- ('In'slmil lliirr 



211 



Kent's Own Believe It or Not 



Explanations 

Straub's matches were all forfeited. 



Kent's backfield men are called 
quarterback, blocking half back and 
two wing; backs. 



Dr. Engleman was installed and in- 
augurated as president of Kent State 
Normal College. 



A college graduates its students but 
the students are graduated and do not 
graduate. 



Shelly wrestled against Ohio State 
as a freshman and threw his opponent, 
although he was not a member of the 
Kent team. 



Webster defines fraternities as stu- 
dent organizations and therefore the 
sororities are included. 



The heads of the departments are 
professors. The rest are classed as as- 
sistants. 

^ ^ ^ 

In addition to the regular groups 
competing, two men, through an error, 
v»ere allowed to wrestle who were un- 
affiliated. 

* * * 

The Delta Phi Sigma teams took 

enough second places to score highest 

in the end. 

^ ^ ^ 

This college was formerly called 
Kent State Normal College. 



The Kent Stater was preceded by 
the Spotlight and dates from its estab- 
lishment. 

* * * 

When the football team reported for 
fall training, one week before school 
opened, the men were allowed to reg- 
ister early and did so. 



Requirements for a First Class 
Sorority House: 

1 shack for an address to receive 
mail from home and males from other 
tov/ns. 

1 telephone with a permanent busy 
signal so as to make the sisters appear 
popular. 

1 chaperon. Preferably deaf, dumb, 
blind and paralized. 

1 large porch, plenty of cushions and 
one swing. 

1 can best black paint for the street 
light in front of the house. 

\ whistle and an official kiss in or- 
der that the sisters may have some- 
thing to teach their dates. 

1 accessory rear window, without 
lock. 

1 sister employed in the office of the 
dean of women. 

27 to 31 other sisters, otherwise em- 
ployed. 



212 



THE CITY BANK 



KENT, OHIO 



Assets Over $1,000,000.00 
Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent 



4 Per Cent on Time Deposits 



DIRECTORS 



M. L. DAVEY 
HENRY HORNING 
B. J. WILLIARD 



H. H. LINE 

D. L. ROCKWELL 

M. G. GARRISON 



E F. GARRISON 



When palroiii;i}iii Ailierlncrs it u:iU pay yon Ic iiuiilton The C.hcilinil liiirr 



213 



ALTCeC APH $ 



214 



Are You V^iWing 
to Forget? 



Soon many of you will be leaving the class-rooms and 
campus of Kent State for the last time as a student. You 
have lived and been a part of the college for four years. 
You have fought her battles, and your own. You will 
emerge from these most precious years of your life with a 
broader, finer outlook on life. 

Your copy of The Chestnut Burr will constantly remind 
you of your happy days at Kent. Are you willing to forget 
the college which nurtured you for four years, or will you 
follow its progress through the columns of its paper? A 
dollar and a half sent to the Kent Stater will bring you tid- 
ings from Kent fifty-two times during the next year. 

THE KENT STATER 

Issued Weekly By the Students of Kent State College 



Hart Schaffner & 

Marx 

CLOTHING 

Walk-Over Shoes 
Men's Furnishings 

Shirts $1.25 to $5.00 

Tye-Best Neckwear $1.00 

Monito Hose 50c 

TUXEDO RENTAL 




K£NT,Qmo 



The Horning 
Coal and Supply 
Company 

furnished sand, gravel, and ce- 
ment for the remodeling of 
Merrill Hall, and Administration 
Building. 

furnishes coal to the college. 

supplies coal to the fraternity 
houses. 

and pleases all Kent. 

Phone 275-W 
113 LAKE STREET 



When f)(ilrnni;iiiii Advertisers it 'u.'ili pay you in mcntioti I he Chesliiiil Burr 



215 



ALTCG CAP H $ 



216 






Sobm IH00& 



Delicious Food 
Moderately Priced 



NEXT TO KENT STATE CAMPUS 



I Why Not 

J "Say It With Flowers"? 
\ 

\ We Furnish Flowers for All 
I Occasions. Phone us at Kent 623 



I 



KENT FLORAL 

COMPANY 

South Water at School Street 

We Telegraph Flowers 



><•> >;<»ii> 




OF FICE SUPPLI ES 

THE NATIONAL BLANK BOOK&SIPPLYCO. 

56 NO. MAIN ST., OPP. N.O.P. BLDG. 




AKRON, OHIO 
Across From The Ohio-Edison Building 

When patronising Adverliic'rs it mil pay you to mention il'e ('heslinil ISiirr 



217 



AUTCeCAPHS 



218 



SAVE EVERY DAY 



at 



DONAGHY'S 

CUT RATE DRUG STORE 

The Rexall Store 

The Kodak Store 



Every Need of 

KENT STATE STUDENTS 

Supplied 

at 

Campus Supply Store 

Postal Sub-Station No. 1 



Firestone 

TIRES 

BATTERY SERVICE 

Complete Alemiting 
Gas and Tire Service 
Veedol and Mobiloil Lubricants 

Young's Tire Service 

INCORPORATED 
MAIN AT DEPEYSTER 



CALL 



44 



KENT 




THE COMMERCIAL OFFICE FURNITURE COMPANY 

''HCIIRO VS" 

E. MARKET AT BROADWAY AKRON, OHIO 

IVhen patromiing Advertisers it ivill pay you to mention The Cbestnut Burr 



219 



STEINER'S BOOK 
STORE 

"The Students' Store" 
» « 

College Supplies 

Gifts 

Books 

Stationery 

Party Goods 

Greeting Cards 

Dennison Goods 

Kodak Finishing 

»« 

E. R. Steiner 



Phone 445 



141 E. MAIN ST. 



THE 



Kneifel Grocery Co. 

Supplies Kent State's Leading 
Fraternities 



# 



Free delivery of the best foods 
at liberal discounts to fraterni- 
ties, sororities, and other college 
organizations. 



It will pay you to see us at 142 
North Water Street, or phone 
Kent 43 and 42. Do it today. 



>'•> •>'<" 



Social Practice 
Decrees 

Flowers for Those Formal 
Events 

A Corsage from Richards will 
"put you right" for the evening 
with her. And the price will fit 
your pocket-book! 

-^ 
Phone 74 

Richards 
Flower Shop 

1312 North Mantua Street 
KENT, OHIO 



MEET YOUR FRIENDS AT 

THE PARADISE 

After classes, after a game, 
a show, or a dance, drop in 
at The Paradise. A con- 
genial place where you can 
chat with your friends, en- 
joy a delicious tid-bit — 
and relax. 

The Paradise 

CONFECTIONERY 

Right on Main St., Diagonally Across 
From the New Kent 

OUR HOME-MADE CANDIES ARE 
DELICIOUS 



When patronising Advertisers it will pay you to mention The Chestnut Burr 



220 



Kent State College 

Dr. James O. Engleman, President 



-^ 



A College of Liberal Arts, giving the degrees A.B. 
and B.S. 

A College of Education, granting the degree B.S. 
in Education. 

A special two-year course leading to a diploma. 

A special three-year course in Physical Education. 



Accredited by the North Central Association, Class A 
rating, .\merican Association of Teachers Colleges. .'Accredited 
by the State Department of Education for training in elemen- 
tary school, kindergarten-primar>', home economics, physical 
education, industrial arts, and music. 



•« 



Kent State is a state-supported college, situated on a hill o\'er- 
looking the cit\- of Kent, in the heart of the most beautiful section 
of Ohio. Extraordinary facilities in buildings, laboratories, gym- 
nasium, and library, a fine facultw and a liberal administration 
gi\e students the utmost in opportunities. .-Xmong other attrac- 
tions is the largest college theatre stage in the state, well lighted 
with the latest of equipment. Kent's athletic teams are respected 
and feared throughout the Ohio Conference, and her weekly paper 
and \earbook rate v.ith the best, and afford students interested in 
journalism a field in which to exhibit their talents. 



This advertisement is inserted in behalf of Kent Slate College h\- the 
editorial and business staffs of The Chestnut Burr, lor further particu- 
lars address The Registrar, Kent State College. 



When patronising Advertisers it will pay you to mention The Chestnut Burr 



221 




= i 

two thousand Annuals in the past 
leven years have selected Canton 
gravings coupled with the Canton 
plan of building a distinctive Annual within 
its budget. Ask any editor or manager 
about their experience with Car 
ton Service. The Canton Er 
graving and Electrotype 
Connpany, Canton, Ohio. 




222